DanceBlue has always been "For The Kids." "For The Kids" may seem like three simple words, but for the DanceBlue community, those words mean everything.

DanceBlue celebrates more than a decade of dancing ‘for the kids’

DanceBlue celebrated its 12th-annual 24-hour dance marathon this past weekend, raising nearly $1.8 million “for the kids.” The group’s slogan is just three simple words, but for the DanceBlue community, “for the kids” means everything.

DanceBlue is UK’s largest student-run philanthropy and has raised more than $11.5 million since 2006 in support of cancer patients, their families and cancer research.

Thanks to 12 years of DanceBlue’s fundraising, UK opened the new, state-of-the-art DanceBlue Kentucky Children’s Hospital Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinic earlier this month. In addition to fundraising, DanceBlue students also volunteer about 1,000 hours in the clinic each year, bringing smiles and laughter to patients and families.

“The students have a real commitment to our patients,” said Dr. Lars Wagner, chief of pediatric hematology and oncology. “They build relationships, then they work hard to raise funds to help support these very kids that they’re getting to know and care for.”

Rachel O’Farrell, a social worker in the DanceBlue Clinic, agreed and said the support patients and their families get from DanceBlue students is invaluable in their treatment journey.

“I think it’s huge to see what it means to patients and families to know that there’s a whole community standing behind them when they’re going through such a difficult experience,” O’Farrell said. “Many of our families feel very lonely, but when you know that there are 900 to 1,000 students dancing and standing for 24 hours to encourage and support your family  I think that holds a lot of meaning.”

Watch the video below to learn more about DanceBlue’s mission and how the group has helped improve cancer care for kids across the Commonwealth.


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This year's DanceBlue event raised nearly $2 million in support of pediatric cancer, with part of those funds going toward the new DanceBlue Clinic.

DanceBlue raises nearly $1.8 million for pediatric cancer patients

Nearly 1,000 UK students spent 24 hours on their feet this weekend, dancing as part of the UK DanceBlue Marathon. It was the culmination and celebration of a yearlong fundraising effort that raised almost $1.8 million for pediatric cancer patients and their families.

DanceBlue the largest student-run philanthropy organization at UK  celebrates its yearly fundraising efforts at the DanceBlue Marathon, an all-day, no-sitting, no-sleeping event that honors those affected by childhood cancer. This year’s celebration took place on Feb. 25 and 26 and included a family talent show featuring children from the clinic and an emotional memorial hour to remember those who lost their battle with cancer.

Since it began in 2006, DanceBlue has raised more than $11.5 million for the Golden Matrix Fund and the DanceBlue Kentucky Children’s Hospital Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinic, which is named in honor of the group. DanceBlue’s fundraising efforts over the last several years helped support the renovation of the new DanceBlue Clinic, which opened in early February.

“For the last 365 days, students at the University of Kentucky have been on a mission to fight pediatric cancer,” said Richie Simpson, the overall chair of DanceBlue. “They have come together to be a part of something so much greater than any one individual, and for the last 24 hours they have literally taken a stand against cancer. They refused to accept the realities of cancer, and they showed the families in the DanceBlue Clinic they are not alone and will never be alone as they face some of the toughest circumstances life can throw at you. It has been an honor to stand alongside students at the university who are so committed to making a difference and changing the world.”


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Even as a child, Rachel Miller knew she wanted to be a doctor

Making the RoundsWe’re joined by Dr. Rachel Miller for our latest edition of Making the Rounds. Dr. Miller is a gynecologic oncologist at the UK Markey Cancer Center who specializes in ovarian cancer screening and treatment. She’s also the co-director of Markey’s new Molecular Tumor Board, a powerful tool in the fight against cancer.

When did you know you wanted to be a doctor?

I think I knew in elementary school. I was very interested in doctoring from an early age. My mom actually saved my Fisher-Price doctor kit and cleaned it up and gave it to my son. So it is well-worn. I did a lot of physical exams when I was between the ages of 4 and 6, I think.

I was a chemistry major, and I thought I might spend some time in the lab. And I was interested in pharmacy, too. So it’s been a long-standing desire. [The challenge] was just trying to figure out what aspect of healthcare and medicine and interaction with people would work best.

What’s your favorite food?

Spaghetti and meatballs. It’s comfort food, and actually, it’s one of the first dishes that my husband made for me when we were dating. It was a birthday dish.

How would your friends describe you?

I think they’d describe me as energetic, active. Kind of crazy in that I may have a little higher work-to-off-time ratio than most of my friends, but we make the most of our time together.

Describe your ideal weekend.

I’d get out of work at a reasonable time on Friday and probably have some Mexican or Indian food or sushi for dinner – some sort of special treat for Friday night. And then on Saturday, I’d wake up – I have a 3 1/2-year-old – so I’d wake up with him in a really good mood and we’d play and have a nice, quiet breakfast. I’d go out for a run, and then we’d have an afternoon of maybe swimming in the summertime or the YMCA in the wintertime. We’d get a babysitter at 6 p.m., and I’d have an evening with my husband. Really, it’d be a quiet weekend at home. I feel like more and more we treasure the downtime and the routine family time at home.

What’s your favorite part about being a mom?

There are so many great parts about it. I think it’s just that my son challenges me in ways that I didn’t realize a 3 1/2-year-old could challenge me. I thought I had a hard job until I became a mom, and I realized that is so much more difficult at times. I just enjoy watching him grow and seeing how every day is just loaded with new experiences for him and how he approaches those experiences, watching him learn language, hearing him laugh – just the day-to-day interactions.


Watch our video interview with Dr. Miller below, where she describes the types of patients she sees at Markey and talks about why she enjoys practicing medicine in Kentucky.


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"Broken heart syndrome" is a real diagnosis, also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, and can be caused by a sudden loss, like the death of a loved one.

‘Broken-heart syndrome’ is a real medical diagnosis

Samy-Claude Elayi, MD

Written by Dr. Samy-Claude Elayi, a cardiologist at the UK Gill Heart Institute.

A traumatic event, such as the sudden loss of a job, divorce or the death of a loved one, can cause us to experience overwhelming emotions. The term “broken-hearted” is often used to describe these reactions, but it’s rarely thought of as life-threatening.

However, broken-heart syndrome is a real diagnosis, also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy. The condition is fairly new to researchers, but the recent deaths of a celebrity daughter and mother just one day apart – actresses Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds, respectively – has shed new light on the heart condition.

What causes a broken heart?

Broken-heart syndrome is a disruption of the heart’s normal pumping process that leads to heart muscle failure. The condition is thought to be triggered by a surge of hormones.

This surge of hormones can be caused by stressful events such as an unexpected death of a loved one, news of a serious medical diagnosis, domestic abuse, losing or winning a large amount of money, loss of a job, or even a divorce.

The most common symptoms include chest pains and shortness of breath. These symptoms are similar to those of a heart attack, and the two are difficult to tell apart based solely on symptoms.

A heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart is cut off due to clogged coronary arteries. However, unlike a heart attack, the broken-heart syndrome is not related to clogged arteries. Instead, part of the heart temporarily enlarges and is not able to pump efficiently, putting more strain on the other parts of the heart.

Diagnosis and treatment

To determine what is causing the chest pain and shortness of breath, doctors may order a chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, blood test, coronary angiogram or an MRI. Once the chest X-ray and MRI verify the condition of the arteries, the doctor will likely ask if you have experienced any recent stressful events or life occurrences.

Women and individuals with head injuries or seizure disorders are more likely to be affected by broken-heart syndrome. There is no clear reason why, and research is still ongoing. Other risk factors include sexual activity, neurological conditions and psychiatric disorders.

Treatment for the condition is similar to that of patients experiencing a heart attack. Patients are kept in the hospital during recovery and are prescribed angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or diuretics that reduce the workload of the heart.

Broken-heart syndrome is rarely fatal, and patients typically recover within a month. There are no long-lasting effects and although recurrence is possible, it is highly unlikely. However, if you’ve experienced a traumatic event and have noticed any of these symptoms, check in with your doctor immediately.


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The American Heart Association have promoted a simple, effective way to identify stroke. But the work of one UK resident could make it even better.

UK neurology resident proposes new way to identify stroke

Organizations like the American Heart Association have promoted the FAST concept to help people recognize the symptoms of stroke. FAST is a mnemonic that stands for facial drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulties and time. It’s used to help people understand the symptoms of a stroke and remind them to act quickly in seeking treatment because strokes can be debilitating or even deadly.

However, a study published in a recent issue of Stroke and authored by a resident physician at UK HealthCare might signal a change in how laypeople understand stroke symptoms and how first responders assess possible strokes.

Identifying areas for improvement

Dr. Sushanth Aroor, a fourth year neurology resident at UK, was inspired by a conversation with Dr. Larry B. Goldstein, co-director of the Kentucky Neuroscience Institute and Aroor’s mentor, to explore how many strokes were initially missed because the FAST mnemonic didn’t apply to them.

“Dr. Goldstein’s idea to look at FAST, which was prompted by a conversation he had with a medical reporter, was something that made a lot of sense to me as I would very often see patients presenting with strokes that were FAST negative,” Aroor said.

Aroor began by identifying all patients admitted at UK in 2014 who were ultimately diagnosed with stroke and then determined how many of those patients initially presented with the FAST symptoms.

“Of the 736 people included in the study, slightly more than 14 percent did not have FAST symptoms but were ultimately diagnosed with a stroke,” he said.

Aroor then tried to quantify additional presenting symptoms for these non-FAST stroke patients and identified two prevalent symptoms: problems with balance (42 percent) and sudden onset of visual problems (40 percent). This led to a modification of the FAST mnemonic to BE-FAST (B for balance and E for eyes).

BE-FAST could change public policy

“We were able to demonstrate that by adding these two symptoms to the FAST mnemonic, the proportion of stroke patients not initially identified was reduced to 4.4 percent,” Aroor said. “Focusing our education efforts on BE-FAST instead of FAST could help reduce the number of missed strokes, therefore improving access time to treatments that could reduce or eliminate disability.”

Goldstein says that Aroor’s study could signal an enormous change in public policy.

“This is potentially a big deal,” Goldstein said. “As Aroor’s study is replicated and fine-tuned prospectively, his work could ultimately change how hospitals and first responders identify potential stroke victims, and change how organizations like the American Heart Association shape their public education campaigns.”

Gaining national notoriety

Other centers – many of whom were looking for hard data to back up their hunch about BE-FAST – are already taking note of Aroor’s study.

“We had been looking to switch to BE-FAST for about six months now but had no evidence-based practice to actually be able to implement the change until this study,” said Angie Russell, RN, BSN, stroke nurse program coordinator for the Lahey Medical Center in Massachusetts.

But Aroor’s study in Stroke provided the data Russell needed to revise Lahey’s stroke alert in-house policy to include BE-FAST. He is now working with her medical practice council to implement BE-FAST at Lahey’s five satellite facilities.

Aroor, characteristically modest, is quite pleased with how his study has been received.

“It’s nice to know that a lot of people are looking at this study and wanting to change how they teach the public how to identify strokes,” he said.

Check out the video of Aroor speaking about the promise of his work:


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Kick-start your heart health with these nutrition tips

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in Kentucky and the nation, accounting for one in every four deaths. Fortunately, there are many things you can do reduce your chances of getting heart disease, starting with a heart-healthy diet.

Foods to eat

To help limit your risk for heart disease and stroke, eat these types of food:

  • Fruits and vegetables. Try to make fruits and veggies at least half of each meal.
  • Whole grains. At least half of your grains should be whole grains. Look for these ingredients: whole wheat, whole oats, oatmeal, whole-grain corn, brown rice, wild rice, whole rye, whole-grain barley, buckwheat, bulgur, millet and sorghum.
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy products. These include milk, calcium-fortified soy drinks (soy milk), cheese, yogurt and other milk products.
  • Seafood, skinless poultry, lean meats, beans, eggs and unsalted nuts.

Foods to avoid

Avoid the following ingredients to improve your heart health:

  • Saturated fats. Saturated fat is usually in pizza, ice cream, fried foods, many cakes and cookies, bacon, and hamburgers. Less than 10 percent of your daily calories should be from saturated fats.
  • Trans fats. These are found mainly in commercially prepared baked goods, snack foods, fried foods and margarine. Choose foods with zero trans fat.
  • Cholesterol. Cholesterol is found in foods made from animals, such as bacon, whole milk, cheese made from whole milk, ice cream, full-fat frozen yogurt and eggs. Fruits and vegetables do not contain cholesterol. Eggs are a major source of dietary cholesterol for Americans, but studies show that eating one egg a day does not increase the risk for heart disease in healthy people. You should eat less than 300 milligrams of cholesterol per day.
  • Sodium. Sodium is found in salt, but most of the sodium we eat does not come from salt we add while cooking or at the table. Most of our sodium comes from breads and rolls, cold cuts, pizza, hot dogs, cheese, pasta dishes and condiments (like ketchup and mustard). Limit your daily sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams (equal to a teaspoon), unless your doctor recommends something else.
  • Added sugars. Foods like fruit and dairy products naturally contain sugar. But you should limit foods that contain added sugars. These include sodas, sports drinks, cake, candy and ice cream.

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There is no cure for Parkinson’s, a debilitating disease that affects movement. But Dr. Craig van Horne's work at UK HealthCare is showing promise.

Listen: Dr. Craig van Horne discusses promising Parkinson’s treatment

Parkinson’s disease is a long-term, progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. There’s no cure for Parkinson’s, but UK neurosurgeon Dr. Craig van Horne‘s experimental treatment is showing promise in helping patients manage the symptoms of this disease.

Van Horne is the director of the Deep Brain Stimulator Center at the Kentucky Neuroscience Institute. He focuses his research on cellular and surgical therapies for Parkinson’s disease.

Deep brain stimulation, or DBS, is a surgical procedure that uses electrodes to stimulate areas of the brain, effectively overriding the damaged nerve’s electrical impulses and reducing many of the symptoms related to Parkinson’s disease. Dr. van Horne is testing an experimental procedure called DBS Plus, which uses a patient’s own peripheral nerve tissue to prompt nerve regeneration and slow the disease process.

Early data shows that DBS Plus has improved symptoms for some patients, and van Horne hopes it will become the new “standard of care” for treating Parkinson’s symptoms.

On this episode of the University of Kentucky’s podcast Behind the Blue, we sat down with Dr. van Horne to discuss DBS Plus, what this treatment may mean for Parkinson’s patients and how this research can impact other areas across the spectrum of healthcare.


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In the era of electronic medical records, one of the greatest opportunities for health innovation lies not in a clinic, but in medical data.

New institute at UK translates medical data into better healthcare

In the modern era of electronic medical records and increasingly sophisticated care, one of the greatest opportunities for health innovation and discoveries lies not in a lab or a clinic, but in medical data.

The progressively routine acquisition of many types of data in healthcare has created numerous opportunities, as well as challenges, in the analysis and interpretation of this data. The emerging academic discipline of data science – which covers the entire life-cycle of data collection, curation, annotation, provenance, integration, exploration, sharing, secondary use and bioinformatics analytics – has the potential to enable great advances in healthcare and medical knowledge.

At UK, the new Institute for Biomedical Informatics (IBI) is leading the effort to translate big data into usable information and leverage the latest technologies to advance biomedical sciences.

The IBI makes it easier to share medical data

A campuswide center for data-intensive, interdisciplinary research, the IBI promotes translational team science, leads informatics and data science training programs, shares research and data infrastructure and enables technology innovation. UK is uniquely positioned in this capacity because of its large health data repository housed in the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) Enterprise Data Trust, which contains regional, state, and national data on clinical and health outcomes.

GQ Zhang, PhD, leads the IBI. He also serves as chief of the Division of Biomedical Informatics (BMI) in the UK College of Medicine and director of the biomedical informatics core of the CCTS. The division of BMI in the College of Medicine serves as the academic home for a group of IBI faculty, while the overlap with the CCTS BMI core connects IBI to the clinical and translational research enterprise.

“The institute is a platform where we can more readily coordinate data and informatics efforts across the entire campus, engaging in research, educational and collaborative initiatives,” Zhang said.

Collaboration fosters success

The IBI has already made great strides in its mission since it was approved by the UK Board of Trustees in June 2016. In only six months, the institute has won external funding, launched collaborative and educational initiatives, and expanded its research staff. It is also now inviting faculty to join as IBI members.

In August 2016, the IBI was awarded a $2.4 million Major Research Instrumentation Award from the National Science Foundation to create a big data computing infrastructure, called the Kentucky Research Informatics Cloud (KyRIC). KyRIC will enhance advanced computational infrastructure for accelerating scientific discovery through computational- and data-intensive research that uses the enormous amounts of data available at UK.

Collaborative team science is central to the work of the IBI. Launching and using KyRIC involves concerted effort with the UK Center for Computational Science and the research computing unit of UK Information Technology Service. The IBI also works closely with the CCTS, integrating the biomedical informatics core of the CCTS with academic and research units across the UK campus. Additionally, the IBI played an instrumental role in the CCTS’ successful application for a second $20 million Clinical and Translational Science Award from the National Institutes of Health, awarded in August 2016.

Extending work beyond campus

The IBI has also started working with the UK Office of Technology Commercialization (OTC) for invention and commercialization opportunities. Potential collaborative projects include patent applications for IBI’s inventions in data management and visualization platforms.

“We plan to work very actively together on a number of fronts, because we are one of the most software- and informatics-intensive units on campus. We create tools and there’s a lot of synergy in tying such efforts to tech transfer,” Zhang said. “I think both parties are very excited because software and technology remain among the most active business sectors for innovation.”

IBI’s collaborations extend beyond campus, as well. The institute serves as the data coordination center of the Center for SUDEP (sudden and unexpected death of a person diagnosed with epilepsy) Research at Case Western Reserve University. Zhang also serves as one of the principal investigators on a collaboration with Harvard University to develop a big data resource called the National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR), which provides access to a rich collection of sleep research data collected on children and adults across the U.S. Both collaborations are funded by the National Institutes of Health.

The IBI is growing rapidly

To support its rapidly growing portfolio of research, educational offerings and collaborations, the IBI has hired two new faculty members and is currently recruiting assistant, associate or full professors in the division of biomedical informatics in the UK College of Medicine. IBI and university leadership are also considering the possibility of establishing a campus-wide graduate informatics program with multiple curricula pathways from data to discovery.

“Leveraging UK’s wealth of data is central to our mission to improve care, make health discoveries, and train the upcoming generation of health professionals and researchers,” said UK Provost Tim Tracy. “The creation of the IBI reflects the university’s commitment to addressing the challenges and opportunities associated with big data. In a short time, the IBI has established robust infrastructure and expertise in informatics that will no doubt lead to exciting opportunities for discovery and learning.”


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Celebrating UK HealthCare’s African-American pioneers

In honor of Black History Month, we’re celebrating some of the African-Americans who have helped shape the story of UK HealthCare.

Their achievements and accomplishments span decades and have influenced the fields of science, medicine and health. Learn more about these individuals in the slideshow below.


Dr. Carl Watson

In 1959, Dr. Carl Watson was the first African-American to graduate from the UK College of Medicine. In 1963, Dr. Watson was among five hand-picked UK medical students to take part in an experimental study tour abroad. He served three months in Jamaica learning preventive medicine.

Dr. Clay Simpson Jr.


In 1958, Dr. Clay Simpson Jr. was the first African-American to graduate from the UK College of Public Health. In 1991, he was presented the Distinguished Presidential Rank Award by President George Bush. In 2004, Simpson was inducted into the UK College of Public Health Hall of Fame.

William Schultz

William Schultz, vice president of the Class of 1954, was the first African-American to graduate from the UK College of Pharmacy.

Marsha Hughes-Rease

In 1972, Marsha Hughes-Rease became the first African-American graduate from the UK College of Nursing and was commissioned as a Navy Nurse Corps officer shortly after graduation. She has been recognized as one of the college’s 50 outstanding alumni.

Dr. Benjamin Nero

In 1967, Dr. Benjamin Nero was the first African-American to graduate from the UK College of Dentistry. He traveled to Haiti to provide dental care to island residents and has mentored many dental students and young dentists.

 

Drs. Keisha Houston, Tourette Jackson and Regina Washington

In 2002, Dr. Keisha Houston, left, and Dr. Tourette Jackson, center, were the first African-American female graduates of the UK College of Public Health. In 2006, Dr. Regina Washington, right, was the first African-American female to earn a doctorate from the UK College of Public Health.

Drs. Melody Holliman Prinkleton and Michelle Ramsey

In 2008, Dr. Melody Holliman Prinkleton, left, and Dr. Michelle Ramsey, right, shared the honor of being the first African-Americans to graduate from UK with four degrees. Each earned two bachelor’s degrees, a master’s degree and a doctorate degree. Both earned doctorates in physical therapy.


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UK nurse anesthetist tests new way to reduce post-surgery memory loss

UK nurse anesthetist tests new way to reduce post-surgery memory loss

No patient wants to remember the traumatic experience of going under the knife.

With the conveniences of modern medicine, anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists erase the memory and pain of invasive surgeries by administering medicines that induce relaxation and unconsciousness. Patients awake from a deep sleep with no memory of the surgery, the incision or the physical harm done to their bodies.

But 10 years ago, Zohn Centimole, a nurse anesthetist at UK HealthCare, noticed his elderly patients were concerned about short-term memory loss, which they attributed to anesthetics. While only temporary, the cognitive deficits caused by anesthesia can linger for several days post-surgery, a period of time when important medical decisions and conversations take place.

Investigating better anesthesia techniques

One of Centimole’s senior patients, who had experienced memory changes after a previous surgery, feared the same effect as she prepared for another surgery. Rather than worry about her postoperative pain and recovery, the patient was fixated on whether she would retain her mental capacity post-surgery.

“My conversation with her that day was one of those imprinting memories,” Centimole said. “Her fear was so sincere and impactful that I can still see her face and everything about the situation.”

This motivated Centimole to investigate more precise techniques of delivering anesthesia and minimizing exposure in middle-aged and senior patients. Centimole, a native of Plum Springs, Ky., harnessed the brain-reading capabilities of a Bispectral Index (BIS) monitor, an electroencephalographic (EEG) technology, to tailor anesthesia to the individual needs of patients.

A collaborative approach to research

Centimole recently defended his doctoral dissertation in the UK College of Nursing, which found anesthesia guided by EEG-derived monitoring was superior to the standard administration and effective in reducing cognitive decline three to five days post-operation. The Bispectral Index System (BIS) measures EEG and converts changes in real time to a score, which anesthesia providers associate with depth of consciousness.

The CANTAB-MCI (Cambridge Cognition) cognitive battery was used to evaluate patient cognitive performance before operation, three to five days post-operation and three to five months post-operation. With its touch-screen format, the battery reduces administrator bias and is cost effective. The EEG-guided technique showed to reduce the cognitive deficits experienced in the post-surgical period, with patients reporting higher cognitive functioning immediately after their surgery.

Collaborating with faculty members in the UK Department of Surgery, the UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and the UK College of Nursing, Centimole conducted an experiment to test the cognitive functioning of surgical patients. He compared those whose anesthesia levels were monitored through a cognitive battery with patients who received surgery without the cognitive battery, as well as a control group of individuals unaffected by anesthesia.

Centimole recruited patients for the study in the preoperative clinic, often recruiting a spouse as the non-surgical counterpart for the control group. Eighty-eight surgical patients were randomized to the BIS cognitive battery condition or the non-battery condition. Both experimental groups, as well as individuals in the non-surgery control group, completed the CANTAB neuropsychological functioning test. The test measures the test taker’s short-term memory, reaction time, verbal memory and visual learning capabilities.

Encouraging results

The 39 surgical patients who received the BIS cognitive battery condition demonstrated high levels of cognitive functioning post-surgery. Centimole also found that patients who smoked reported lower cognitive function post-surgery, suggesting a correlation between smoking and lower cognition after surgery. The results of the study suggest that EEG-derived technology has the potential to assist anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists in tailoring their care to individual cognitive characteristics.

“We were looking for a way to assess cognitive frailty in patients,” Centimole said. “Being precise and tailoring anesthesia will vary from patient to patient. EEG-derived technology allows you to balance exposure without unwanted side effects. We want to keep tight control over exposure, and this is what that device was engineered to do.”

Centimole believes EEG-derived devices can enhance care and improve engagement and alertness in patients who were disadvantaged by the memory loss caused during their surgery. Further, the CANTAB-MCI battery was cost-effective, and it showed the potential to help providers evaluate frailty in patients preparing to undergo surgery.

“The novelty of the project is knowing there is a relationship between EEG-guided anesthesia and cognitive function,” he said. “But we also present evidence that this cognitive battery is financially appropriate and has a great ease of use.”


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