Barnstable Brown proud to sponsor UK Opera Theatre’s ‘It’s a Grand Night for Singing’

The UK HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center is proud to sponsor the 25th anniversary of the UK Opera Theatre’s It’s a Grand Night for Singing, running now through June 19.

This is the first year of sponsorship between the Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center and the UK Opera Theatre.

“We look forward to a long and wonderful relationship with the talented physicians and researchers working to find solutions to one of our nation’s most pressing health issues,” said Everett McCorvey, DMA, producer and executive director of the UK Opera Theatre.

About Barnstable Brown

Established in 2008, the Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center is a multidisciplinary center designed to conduct research, provide medical management in every area of diabetes and deliver educational support to assist patients and families in implementing lifestyle changes.

Patricia Barnstable-Brown and her twin sister, Priscilla Barnstable, host the annual Barnstable Brown Kentucky Derby Eve Gala. The celebrity-packed gala’s financial impact to the diabetes center at UK has been about $13 million over the past 10 years.


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Kentucky Neuroscience Institute recognized for high-quality stroke patient care

The American Heart Association and American Stroke Association recently honored UK HealthCare’s Kentucky Neuroscience Institute (KNI) with the Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award and the Target Stroke Honor Roll Elite Plus Award.

These achievements recognize UK HealthCare’s commitment and success in adhering to the most current, evidence-based stroke treatment guidelines for stroke patient care and outcomes.

To receive the Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award, hospitals must achieve 85 percent or higher adherence to all Get With The Guidelines-Stroke achievement indicators for two or more consecutive 12-month periods. They must also achieve 75 percent or higher compliance with five of eight Get With The Guidelines-Stroke quality measures.

The Target Stroke Honor Roll Elite Plus recognition is given to hospitals that treat more than 75 percent of appropriate patients with clot-busting drugs within 60 minutes of arrival and more than 50 percent within 45 minutes.

The quality measures are designed to help hospital teams provide the most up-to-date, evidence-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients. They focus on appropriate use of guideline-based care for stroke patients, including aggressive use of medications such as clot-busting and anticlotting drugs, blood thinners and cholesterol-reducing drugs, preventive action for deep vein thrombosis, and smoking-cessation counseling.

Larry Goldstein, MD

Larry Goldstein, MD

“Comprehensive Stroke Center status reflects our capability to provide the most advanced care for patients with stroke,” said KNI Co-Director Dr. Larry Goldstein. “These awards further underscore the hard work of our multidisciplinary team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, emergency physicians, nurses, therapists and others to optimize care delivery for stroke patients right here in Lexington.”

2017 marks the seventh year that KNI has received Gold Plus designation. It is the only hospital in Lexington to have both the Get With The Guidelines Stroke Gold Plus and Target Stroke Honor Roll Elite Plus designations.

The KNI Stroke Center is also certified as a Comprehensive Stroke Center by The Joint Commission – its highest honor.


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UK HealthCare, The Medical Center and WKU are opening a medical campus in Bowling Green, Ky., to increase access to healthcare for generations to come.

UK celebrates groundbreaking of new College of Medicine-Bowling Green campus

Healthcare leaders from UK, The Medical Center at Bowling Green and Western Kentucky University celebrated on Tuesday the groundbreaking of the new UK College of Medicine-Bowling Green campus.

The four-year, regional campus medical school is the first of its kind in Kentucky and is a partnership between The Medical Center, UK and WKU.

The UK College of Medicine-Bowling Green Campus will be a fully functioning campus, using the same curriculum and assessments as UK’s campus in Lexington. On-site faculty will have UK College of Medicine appointments and teach in small groups and provide simulation/standardized patient experiences with lectures delivered on-site from Lexington using educational technology. Additionally, clinical experiences will occur at The Medical Center at Bowling Green and surrounding community practices.

“At the University of Kentucky, we know that working together – across disciplines and across the Commonwealth – is the best way to ensure real, positive change for those we serve,” UK President Eli Capilouto said. “This collaboration will allow us to effectively and efficiently utilize existing resources throughout the state to meet this important need for more physicians and greater access to healthcare.”

“Through this investment in education, we are continuing to increase access to quality healthcare – and ensuring that we have the physicians available to take care of generations to come,” said Connie Smith, president and chief executive officer of Med Center Health. “We have always had a commitment to bringing the best in healthcare to our communities. This medical school is going to raise the bar even higher as we increase opportunities for research and technology and adhere to the latest in evidence-based practice.”

Basic science and early didactic training will be taught in conjunction with faculty at WKU through both on-site classes and distance education methods in accordance with UK College of Medicine curricular protocols.

“This partnership helps ensure our state will remain competitive as the landscape of healthcare changes,” said Dr. Robert DiPaola, dean of the UK College of Medicine. “It also signals a new beginning in the efforts to train more physicians in Kentucky, for Kentucky, and especially a new beginning for our future students as they embark on this journey and career in medicine. It is an honor to celebrate this milestone with our partners in developing the UK College of Medicine-Bowling Green campus.”

Longtime UK faculty member and administrator Dr. Todd Cheever will serve as the first associate dean for the Bowling Green campus. Dr. Don Brown, a vascular surgeon and Bowling Green physician, who also serves as director of medical education at The Medical Center, has been named assistant dean.

The UK College of Medicine-Bowling Green Campus will host 30 students per year. The facility will be part of a multipurpose building attached to a five-story parking garage constructed on the campus of The Medical Center. Construction is scheduled for completion by the summer of 2018.


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cancer survivor

Markey clinic promotes quality of life for cancer survivors

This Sunday is National Cancer Survivors Day, an annual event that encourages those who have survived  cancer to celebrate milestones and supports patients and families currently going through treatment.

At the UK Markey Cancer Center, we have a specialized program just for cancer survivors that offers support and resources to help navigate the complicated and often-overwhelming aspects of life after treatment.

Cancer Survivorship Clinic

Even after treatment is complete, cancer can impact a patient’s physical, emotional, social and financial well-being. Our Cancer Survivorship Clinic is designed to help patients overcome those challenges by connecting their medical history with their future quality of life as a cancer survivor.

When a patient is referred to the Survivorship Clinic, they meet with a provider who specializes in survivorship care. That provider then works with the patient to customize a personalized plan that coordinates ongoing medical care and promotes the patient’s health and wellness moving forward.

Individual care plans address important aspects of patients’ continued care including long-term effects of treatment, diet and nutrition, emotional and psychological support, and social and financial concerns.

The Cancer Survivorship Clinics are located in the Whitney-Hendrickson Building and the Ben Roach Building at the UK Markey Cancer Center. If you have questions about our clinic or would like to make an appointment, please call us at 800-333-8874.

Expressions of Courage

Later this month, Markey and the Survivorship Clinic will host the annual Expressions of Courage event, a cancer survivor celebration timed to coincide with other nationwide celebrations in June for Cancer Survivorship Month.

Expressions of Courage honors the experiences of those who have battled cancer by displaying their art and creative expressions, many of which can be linked to their cancer experiences. This year’s event is scheduled from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on June 9 and will feature visual, literary, and musical performances from Markey cancer survivors as well as a free lunch and access to support services.

Learn more about Expressions of Courage and register for the event today.


Next steps:

  • Markey is Kentucky’s only NCI-designated cancer center, providing world-class cancer care right here in the Commonwealth. Learn more about why patients choose Markey for their cancer treatment.
  • When her previous oncologist told Annette Osborne there was no hope, she came to Markey and found another chance at life. Read Annette’s story.
During the third annual Appalachian Research Day, UK researchers revealed the insights of their studies aimed at addressing health problems of rural Ky.

Appalachian Research Day addresses rural health issues

Inviting researchers to “come sit on the porch” and share their findings with community members, the UK Center for Excellence in Rural Health (CERH) hosted its third annual Appalachian Research Day in Hazard, Ky., on May 24.

Rural Appalachian communities experience some of the most severe health disparities in the nation, and community-based research is an effective method to identify problems and develop collaborative, effective solutions.

This type of engaged research begins at the local level, built on the foundation of relationships with individuals, neighborhoods and groups who have common questions and concerns. And for many researchers at UK and partner institutions, the CERH is an indispensable resource for conducting community-based research. It provides local connections, infrastructure, dedicated research personnel and a team of community health workers, called Kentucky Homeplace, who engage participants and gather data.

“Appalachian Research Day is an important and exciting day for us each year at the UK Center of Excellence in Rural Health. It is an opportunity for us to provide research updates to our community about relevant issues that affect all of us,” said Fran Feltner, director of the CERH. “Appalachian Research Day is also an opportunity for dialogue with community members to discuss what we can come up with together to better our lives in Appalachia.”

This year’s event, which was held at Hazard Community and Technical College to accommodate the growing number of participants, included Hazard Mayor Jimmy Lindon and Perry County Judge-Executive Scott Alexander, who both made remarks during lunch. Also present were Andrea Begley, field office representative for U.S. Congressman Hal Rogers, and Jenna Meyer of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who is on special assignment in Eastern Kentucky for the Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR) initiative.

Research insights in cancer, addiction, nutrition

Featured presentations reported findings from five health research studies conducted with Appalachian communities:

  • Dr. Susanne Arnold, associate director of clinical translation at the UK Markey Cancer Center, presented her research examining the interrelated causes of lung cancer and how to combat them. She reported that lung cancer risk has environmental, physical and molecular causes, some of which can be prevented.
  • Nancy Schoenberg, PhD, associate dean for research of the UK College of Public Health and Marion Pearsall Professor of Behavioral Science in the UK College of Medicine, studies the health of grandfamilies in Appalachia. Her recent study with rural adults over age 65 found that half of them struggled to make ends meet and experienced many physical health problems.
  • Dr. Judith Feinberg, professor in the Department of Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry at West Virginia University School of Medicine, studies behavioral medicine and psychiatry. She presented her research on addiction as a chronic, relapsing brain disease, reporting that syringe services programs (SSPs) operate under the principles of harm reduction and have been shown to offer significant protection for people injecting drugs, including lower risk of HIV infection.
  • Jarod T. Giger, PhD, of the UK colleges of social work, medicine and public health, studies child well-being in Eastern Kentucky. In a recent study, he found that children in three Eastern Kentucky counties reported relatively high amounts of electronic health literacy but low amounts of overall life satisfaction and affective and psychological well-being.
  • Omopé Carter Daboiku is an Appalachian foodways scholar who leads workshops that operate on an emotional level to help participants understand that adapting family recipes to healthier versions doesn’t disrespect one’s ancestors. Her work incorporates nostalgic attachment to food memories, with the understanding that the relationships these memories invoke can make it difficult to prepare healthier food.

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Following a positive birth experience with a certified nurse midwife (CNM), JoAnna Burris felt called to become one herself. Now, she works as a CNM at UK.

Positive birth experience inspires woman to become a UK midwife

Certified nurse midwife JoAnne Burris describes birth as a poetic paradox: an instance of power and vulnerability in a woman’s life. This important scale can tip in favor of vulnerability or empowerment, depending on the woman’s sense of control and support.

After the birth of her first child in 2005, Burris related giving birth to feelings of vulnerability, frustration and helplessness, which stemmed from a traumatic birth experience in which healthcare providers dominated the decision-making.

Determined to have a more positive birth experience, Burris sought care from a certified nurse midwife (CNM) when she became pregnant with her second baby in 2008. She partnered with Melissa Courtney, a certified nurse midwife who was in her first year of practice at Lexington Women’s Health. CNMs place emphasis on the individual needs, birth vision and preferences of the patient, designing a custom birth experience for each woman all while ensuring a safe passage for mother and baby. For her second birth, Burris decided to use hypnosis, a natural relaxation technique to help control labor pain, and Courtney embraced the practice as part of the delivery plan. Burris also brought concerns stemming from the trauma of the first delivery, and Courtney addressed each concern with respect and consideration.

“Each prenatal visit, I felt like I would come to Melissa with a new fear,” Burris said, recalling her first birth. “At each appointment, she didn’t dismiss my fears. She treated me as an intelligent woman with valid concerns.”

Also distinctive from the first birth experience, Courtney reinforced Burris’ confidence with encouragement and affirmation that she was capable of having a natural birth. Burris never questioned whether she was in control of her body, her medical care or the details of her birth experience. This patient-centered emphasis continued into the actual birth experience. Burris remained in control of every decision, such as her preference for her birthing position, and Courtney followed her lead.

“We try to listen and meet women where they are,” Courtney said. “We try to build their confidence in themselves so they realize they are very capable. It’s the strong belief that if a woman can have a positive experience in her birth, it then sets her up for her motherhood experience.”

Patient-centered care leads to empowerment

Burris said she went into labor confident in her ability to deliver her son in a manner consistent with her preferences and beliefs. With relief she gained through the Hypnobabies technique, she was able to truly enjoy her natural birth. After her son’s birth, she wrote a letter to Courtney expressing gratitude and insisting her support made a difference. She said Courtney reduced the feelings of vulnerability and tipped the scale in favor of empowerment, which led to the success of the delivery.

“During my birth, when I was ready to push, all I remember hearing from Melissa was reassurance,” Burris said.

Burris was forever changed by her birth experience with Courtney. With two drastically divergent birth experiences, she believed the patient-centered preparation, supportive care and freedom to choose her own path pointed her toward a positive, redeeming birth experience. She felt a spiritual calling to help other women experience pregnancy and birth as a natural – not scary or traumatic – life stage and realize their potential to remain in control of their health with the supportive partnership of a CNM.

“How many other people go home and night and say, ‘Today I empowered a woman in the most important moment in her life?’” Burris said. “That is what (Courtney) did for me. I want to give that gift to other women.”

A year after the birth of her son, Burris quit her nine-to-five job and started the process of becoming a CNM. She returned to college to complete her associate’s degree in nursing, then acquired the years of labor and delivery nursing experience required before attending midwifery school. Her midwifery training was done at Womankind Midwives, the practice Courtney established in 2011. Last fall, she was hired at the UK HealthCare Polk Dalton Clinic.

Provider and patient now practice together

Now, with a new partnership between UK HealthCare and Womankind Midwives, Courtney and Burris, formerly provider and patient, will partner together as colleagues empowering women throughout Central Kentucky. The UK Midwife Clinic will provide midwifery services through four full-time CNMs, including Courtney and Burris, and additional resources and expertise through access to the UK Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the only Level IV Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Courtney sees the collaboration as benefiting patients who want more options when considering a delivery experience. The merger also benefits both organizations, as CNMs will have the opportunity to teach holistic, natural birthing techniques to medical residents and increase the acceptance and integration of these techniques, and the large academic hospital expands its realm of women’s health services to include midwifery.

“I think it’s awesome that we get to work together now, being able to develop this program at UK with JoAnne is super exciting,” Courtney said. “We are not only impacting Lexington, but we will hopefully impact the residents that we will work with and take that experience to their future practices.”

Burris also looks forward to promoting positive health experiences for women beyond childbearing. The UK Midwife Clinic, located at 141 N. Eagle Creek Drive in Lexington, will provide a variety of services, such as general obstetrics and primary healthcare across the lifespan. Patients will deliver babies at the UK Birthing Center with the care of a midwife. From her personal experiences, Burris knows putting women at the center of their care and encouraging them to believe they are in control are crucial first steps for ensuring positive outcomes.

“This field focuses on empowering women through health education and promotion,” Burris said. “If we can provide a sense of control and empowerment while providing safe, high-quality care, it will affect their whole family. We are treating the whole woman so she can be a force for positive health change in her family.”

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Next steps:

  • UK Midwife Clinic provides patients with exceptional, compassionate care. Learn more.
  • The UK Polk-Dalton Clinic provides a wide range of primary medical care services, including obstetrics and gynecology. The clinic also features a certified nurse midwife.
Dr. Michael Karpf, UK’s executive vice president for health affairs, was recently awarded the Kentucky Hospital Association's Distinguished Service Award.

Karpf receives Kentucky Hospital Association’s highest honor

Dr. Michael Karpf, UK’s executive vice president for health affairs, was given the Kentucky Hospital Association’s highest award last week in honor of his exceptional service to UK HealthCare, the community, the state and the association.

Karpf was given the KHA’s Distinguished Service Award on May 19 during the 88th Annual KHA Convention in Lexington. Since coming to UK in 2003, Karpf’s leadership has led to unprecedented growth and expansion for UK HealthCare. In the past 14 years, UK has invested close to $2 billion for faculty recruitment, program development, technology acquisition and facilities, while also fostering partnerships with leading regional health providers across the state to extend care to those who need it most.

UK HealthCare is a thriving super-regional referral center with aspirations to become a medical destination and one of the nation’s best healthcare providers, due in large measure to Karpf’s vision and leadership. Last fall, Karpf announced his decision to retire later in 2017. A national search for his successor is currently underway.

Karpf has served on the KHA Board of Trustees from 2010 until 2015, and he continues to support and serve KHA through the System Presidents’ Forum.

Recognition for UK HealthCare volunteer

UK’s Snow Bunny Baby Project was also honored by the KHA, earning the HANDS Award (Helping Accomplish Noteworthy Duties Successfully), which is given to outstanding volunteer and auxiliary programs in hospitals across the state.

The Snow Bunny Baby project, created in 2015 by dedicated UK volunteer Sunny King, provides holiday gift baskets to families of babies in the Kentucky Children’s Hospital neonatal intensive care unit.

Betty Rucker, chair of the KHA Committee on Volunteer Services, presents a 2017 HANDS Award to Sunny King (middle) and Katie Tibbitts of UK HealthCare.


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UK is researching how a mobile application teaches patients diaphragmatic breathing, a technique which may alleviate muscle tension in victims of violence.

UK study looks to mobile app to help victims of abuse manage pain

Women who have suffered from sexual or physical abuse often have residual muscle tension and pain, a symptom of extended stress and activity within the body. Now, two UK researchers are studying how a smartphone app could help these women manage chronic pain.

Charles Carlson, the Robert H. and Anna B. Culton Endowed Professor in the UK Center for Research on Violence Against Women, says a significant portion of the clinic’s female patients have suffered from sexual or physical abuse at some point in their lives, which often results in tension throughout the body that can lead to pain.

Trauma often causes a prolonged state of increased sympathetic tone within the body,” Carlson said. “The chronic hypervigilance may be associated with scanning for danger around every corner. [This can lead] to a state of prolonged and unnecessary muscle tension and eventually, if unchecked, may contribute to muscle-based pain conditions such as myalgia. It is not surprising, therefore, that a significant number of our patients with chronic pain reported experience with physical or sexual abuse.”

Carlson, who is also a professor of psychology in the UK College of Arts and Sciences, and Matt Russell, a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology, want to help patients learn to calm their hypervigilance through strategies that can manage the excessive activation of muscle-based pain. Their previous research shows that patients with chronic pain can find relief through self-regulation strategies that include slow-paced, diaphragmatic breathing – a form of relaxation training.

App teaches self-guided breathing

With the help of a smartphone app that teaches users how to do diaphragmatic breathing, the researchers are currently conducting a clinical trial at the UK Orofacial Pain Clinic, working with patients experiencing myalgia and other chronic pain in the head and neck regions.

Diaphragmatic breathing is a practice most people can learn, so Carlson and Russell are exploring whether patients can help manage their pain by learning to breathe diaphragmatically without the use of a professional therapist. By providing patients with a mobile application that teaches the diaphragmatic breathing approach, the team hypothesizes patients will learn to self-regulate their body’s sympathetic tone to manage their pain.

“We designed the smartphone application to teach patients the basics of paced, diaphragmatic breathing with audio directions only,” Russell said. “Then, we use a visual aid to help pace their breathing, an important piece of strengthening the parasympathetic response.”

The current project will examine the effectiveness of the smartphone health intervention to improve treatment outcomes above standard dental care. The participants recruited through the Orofacial Pain Clinic will receive either standard dental care alone, or standard dental care plus the mobile application on their iPhone/iPad or a provided iPod Touch. Patients using the application will track their daily breathing practices and pain levels, while those receiving standard dental care alone will track only their pain levels. All participants will complete weekly assessments, and at each clinic follow-up visit, participants’ progress will be monitored by collecting measures of their current self-regulation skills.

While a quick iTunes search can result in hundreds of apps that promote breathing strategies to treat various ailments, Carlson emphasizes the importance of empirical evidence.

“To our knowledge, there are no published studies empirically validating that these applications can deliver on their promises,” he said. “As clinical scientists, we believe that before we tell our patients our application will help, we need evidence from a scientific study.”


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UK scientist joins program that promotes diversity in research

Dr. Brittany Smalls, an assistant professor in the UK Center for Health Services Research, has been selected as a scholar in the 2017-18 Programs to Increase Diversity among Individuals Engaged in Health-Related Research Advanced Health Disparities Research Training program.

As a scholar for this program, Smalls will receive advanced training that facilitates successful team science and contributes to decreases in health disparities through research. This year-long mentoring experience will offer training that includes experiential skill development in grantsmanship, scientific writing strategies, epidemiological/bio-statistical methods and more.

The program was established to provide junior faculty from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical research with opportunities to gain the knowledge and tools they need to carry out independent and meaningful research and advance their careers.

This initiative is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The institute provides global leadership for research, training and education programs to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung and blood diseases and enhance the health of all individuals so that they can live longer and more fulfilling lives.


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RB2

UK’s new research facility will target Kentucky’s health concerns

Lisa Cassis

Lisa Cassis, PhD, UK vice president for research

Written by Lisa Cassis, PhD, UK vice president for research.

If you’ve driven along Virginia Avenue in Lexington, toward the main UK campus, you’ve probably seen the steel skeleton of the new research building under construction. This is Research Building 2, or RB2, a precious resource and a vehicle for UK to reduce the health disparities that most impact Kentucky.

This building will house researchers that focus on the following health disparities: cancer, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and stroke, and substance abuse. These conditions have a major adverse impact on the health of Kentuckians, contributing to death rates from each disease that rank within the top 11 states in the nation.

RB2 will enable multidisciplinary research that approaches these disparities from numerous fields and perspectives healthcare researchers (both basic and clinical), public health, behavioral sciences, agriculture outreach and extension, economics, and engineering working in close proximity and collaboratively to develop solutions to these complex problems.

This $265-million building (funded half from the state of Kentucky, half from university resources, including private gifts) is scheduled to open in summer of 2018.

Thoughtful design and collaboration

The design of this modern research facility embodies a lifestyle that reduces health disparities, including a healthy food choice restaurant, a room to house bicycles for travel to and from the facility, and prominent staircases to encourage physical activity.

Within the laboratories, the design and focus comes with a specific scientific underpinning: Much of discovery today, whether at the cellular or community level, happens at the intersection of disciplines. By placing investigators together in “neighborhoods,” this facility is designed to foster discovery and collaboration so that what happens in the course of basic research can be translated to answers and solutions at the community level.

When researchers who are working on the same problem say, cancer but from different angles (economics, biomedicine, public health), work next to each other in a single building, it facilitates communication and promotes new avenues for problem solving. Through this design, the project will improve the lives of Kentuckians by providing modern space that lends itself to multidisciplinary research that is needed to address entrenched health problems.

Tackling Kentucky’s worst problems

While each of these major diseases influence citizens across the Commonwealth, they are of immense concern to our citizens residing in rural Appalachia, a region with some of the most pronounced rates of chronic diseases in the country.

A recent report from the University of Washington showed rates of death from cancer in the United States dropped by 20 percent between 1980 and 2014. However, these gains were not distributed equally across the country. Clusters of high mortality were found in many states, including Kentucky.

Four main factors are thought to drive these disparities: socioeconomic status, access to healthcare, quality of available healthcare and prevalence of risk factors, such as smoking, obesity and lack of physical activity. The Appalachian region of Kentucky experiences a perfect storm of these factors driving disparities.

A primary focus of research within the new building will be determining factors that drive more disease risk and burden in Appalachia, and developing preventive and therapeutic approaches that are optimized to have greater benefit to those living in this region.

Harnessing our strengths

RB2, the Biological Biomedical Research Building and the Lee T. Todd Jr. Building will be linked in complex, to further foster collaborative and multidisciplinary research. The connecting conduit building, serving as the spine of the complex, has been named the Appalachian Translational Trail, as it will house the nucleus of translational researchers who bring together all disciplines.

The real power of research is realized in bringing different groups of experts together, and in order to tap into that power, we applied a multidisciplinary approach to the planning of this new building. We began by aligning our work with the goals of UK’s 2015-2020 Strategic Plan. These goals invest in UK’s existing strengths and areas of growth in selected focus areas that benefit and enrich the lives of the citizens of the Commonwealth; recruit and retain outstanding faculty, staff and students; improve the quality of the research infrastructure across campus; and strengthen engagement efforts and translation of research. The planning and implementation of RB2 touches on each of these goals.

The health disparities we are targeting are areas of current UK strength in research and healthcare. We have strong individual investigators across all colleges at UK, as well as existing collaborative research centers that can bring intensified focus in these areas. We’ve tapped these experts, based on thematic areas in each of these health disparities, to use data to evaluate our current resources and identify areas in which we could strategically invest to expand resources and hire new investigators, who will most likely be housed within RB2, to make the biggest impact for Kentucky.

By growing our research enterprise to focus on the most critical health needs of Kentucky, we can translate basic science findings to clinical practice and to the community to fight these devastating health disparities and improve the quality of life for Kentuckians. We thank Kentucky legislators for their support of RB2, and we will do everything in our power through this precious resource to make that difference.


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