Going to a trampoline park? Reduce injury risk with these tips

Now that the weather has gotten chillier, you may be looking for fun indoor activities to do with the kids. If you’re headed to an indoor trampoline park, know that while they do encourage physical activity, they can also be dangerous. The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that over 100,000 children visited emergency rooms last year due to trampoline accidents, and there’s even a fracture that some doctors call “trampoline ankle.”

If you and your kids are heading to an indoor trampoline park for a birthday party or just for a day of fun, keep these tips in mind:

  • Always have adult supervision. Children should only jump with a responsible adult around.
  • One person at a time. Be aware of other jumpers.
  • Discourage double-jumping. This is when one person lands just as another person is attempting to jump.
  • No flips or somersaults. These can lead to head and neck injuries, wrist sprains or fractures, or other serious injuries.
  • Wear comfortable clothing that does not restrict your movement.
  • Don’t wear jewelry or other sharp objects while jumping. Empty your pockets and don’t wear a hat while jumping, either.
  • Avoid peak hours. Go during less busy times so there are fewer people and fewer distractions.
  • Stay in age-appropriate areas. This includes adults!

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends that children under 6 should not jump on trampolines or visit indoor trampoline parks at all. Children’s bones are still growing, so jumping on a trampoline poses a high risk of injury, according to Dr. John Draus, a pediatrician at UK HealthCare and director of the UK Pediatric Trauma Program.

Most injuries take place because of collisions while jumping, incorrect landings or falling off a trampoline onto a hard surface. Always follow the safety guidelines set forth by the trampoline park.


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How a 30-minute doctor’s visit inspired this surgeon’s career

Making the RoundsWe caught up with Dr. Chaitu Malempati, an orthopaedic surgeon with UK Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine who works at The Medical Center at Bowling Green, for our latest Making the Rounds interview.

Dr. Malempati is also the medical director and team physician for Western Kentucky University Athletics, a role that allows him to treat athletes from a variety of different sports.

What types of injuries do you treat?

In my clinic, I see most frequently shoulder and knee injuries. These can be acute injuries that are sports-related or work-related or they can be general chronic injuries caused by arthritis.

At Western Kentucky, I take care of all the sports teams and I travel with the football and men’s basketball teams. I do training room a couple times a week, seeing various athletes in all kinds of sports.

When is surgery recommended for an injury?

Although I’m a surgeon and I love surgery – that’s why I went into the field – I want people to have surgery only when the benefits outweigh the risks. I will do everything in my power to treat people non-surgically first. I really only like to do surgery when I know I can help someone with minimal risks.

What inspires you to go to work each day?

Helping people. Getting people back to the lifestyle or the function they were at before pain or decreased function took over. Getting people back to where they can do the things that make them happy and live the lifestyle that they want to live. That’s really what drives me and encourages me to come to work every day. Whether it be surgical or non-surgical treatment, just helping them get back to where they want to be.

There’s really nothing better than hearing a patient say that they’re doing better or that I helped them get back to playing sports or doing what they love. That’s what inspires me.

When did you decide to pursue medicine as a career?

To be honest, I didn’t know I wanted to do medicine at all when I was an undergrad at the University of Iowa. I played tennis there on scholarship and I hurt my shoulder between my junior and senior years. I went to see an orthopaedic surgeon at the University of Iowa, who I thought was great. He explained to me what the shoulder was, what the labrum was and why my injury was causing pain. And after that 30-minute visit, I realized that’s what I wanted to do.

If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go?

I recently traveled to Italy, which was on my bucket list and was great. But if I could travel anywhere else, it would probably be Australia because there’s a lot of interesting stuff there – there’s the Outback, there’s the Great Barrier Reef and the people there seem very happy.

What’s your favorite food?

Pizza and pasta. Anything Italian.

How would your friends and family describe you?

Energetic, goofy. Someone who likes to enjoy life, who likes to have fun with anything I’m doing, whether it be related to work or not. I try to enjoy everything I do.


Watch our video interview with Dr. Malempati below, where he talks more about the integrative approach his practice offers patients to help treat a variety of orthopaedic injuries.


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Exercise pain could be compartment syndrome, says UK team doctor

Dr. Kimberly Kaiser

Written by Dr. Kimberly Kaiser, a physician with UK Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine and a team physician with UK Athletics.

Each of our arms and legs have compartments that contain muscles and nerves which are surrounded by tough walls of tissue called fascia.

When we experience an injury or overuse our muscles, these compartments can fill with fluid and swell. In some people, the fascia surrounding each compartment is not very flexible and swelling can restrict blood flow, which can lead to pain, numbness and weakness in the affected limb. These may be signs of compartment syndrome.

Compartment syndrome occurs when excessive pressure builds up in an enclosed muscle space. The acute condition is often the result of bleeding or swelling into the muscle after an injury like a severe bone fracture or a crush injury, and while rare, it is a surgical emergency.

The chronic condition, called chronic exertional compartment syndrome or CECS, is often the result of prolonged physical activity and is most common in endurance athletes like runners and soccer players.

Symptoms and treatment

For those experiencing CECS, the associated symptoms occur, or worsen, during physical activity and subside immediately after stopping. Symptoms of CECS can mimic symptoms of other overuse injuries such as plantar fasciitis or shin splints, and if you’re middle aged or older, it may be the result of cholesterol build-up in the blood vessels. Your doctor may want to perform several tests to rule out other diagnoses.

Treatment for CECS depends on your activity levels and fitness goals. A physician may suggest modifying or taking a break from the exercise causing the injury or performing low-impact activities such as biking or swimming. Physical therapy, strengthening and stretching are a few approaches that can help relieve symptoms.

For those who don’t respond to conservative measures, or if activity modification is not an option, surgery may be the most effective treatment. The surgical procedure, called a fasciotomy, involves opening or removing the fascia in each affected compartment to relieve pressure. While there is a risk of complications associated with surgery, compartment syndrome left untreated can lead to permanent muscle and nerve damage, or the inability to continue participating in your favorite activity.

If you experience symptoms after an injury, or if symptoms develop during physical activity and worsen over time, it’s important to talk with your primary care provider and see a doctor who specializes in sports medicine.


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UK researcher working to prevent concussions in jockeys

It’s the fifth race on a beautiful, sunny day at Keeneland Race Course in Lexington and the jockeys are on their mounts up in the gates. The bell rings and the horses spring forward, looking for the perfect spot from which to make their charge. At the second turn, the No. 8 horse stumbles and recovers, but its jockey tumbles to the dirt. He sits for a few seconds, dazed, but then leaps to his feet and scrambles to safety.

Injuries are frequent among jockeys. During a recent interview, one jockey listed a jaw-dropping succession of injuries: two broken collarbones, a fractured wrist, broken ribs, a fractured spine and several occasions when he “got his bell rung.” These athletes get back to their jobs as quickly as possible – and potentially before they’re completely healed. That’s because, unlike other professional sports which offer guaranteed contracts to their players, horse racing operates on a “pay-to-play” model:  jockeys don’t get paid unless they’re riding.

Concussion dangers

While broken bones are nearly impossible to miss, concussions are a subtle but potentially more dangerous injury. Concussions – a brain injury caused by whiplash or other blow to the head – are notoriously difficult to diagnose, and symptoms are transient but can last several days or even weeks.

Repeated concussions have a cumulative effect. A recent study in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, determined that 110 of 111 autopsied brains donated to science by former NFL players showed evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head and believed to be responsible for later cognitive impairment, depression and/or aggression. At this time there is no data to document the incidence of CTE among jockeys, although anecdotal evidence exists; for example, the effects of Gwen Jocson’s repeated concussions forced her retirement from racing in 1999.

During the healing process after a concussion, victims can experience headaches, memory loss, balance issues, sleep disturbances and/or disorientation. According to UK College of Health Sciences researcher Carl Mattacola, PhD, ATC, that’s a dangerous state to be in if you’re trying to pilot a 1,000-pound horse around a track at 30 miles per hour. That’s why he’s developed a clinical and research interest in helping jockeys.

Developing a safety protocol

Historically, Mattacola says, attention for the jockeys has been secondary to the equine athlete. But as the awareness of the dangers of concussion has risen, all corners of the racing industry – the tracks, the horse owners, and the jockeys themselves – have come together to assess the situation and lay the groundwork for a new model. And that process has its origins in Kentucky, born of a partnership between the Jockeys’ Guild, the Jockey Club, and the UK College of Health Sciences, among others. This is the second year of a pilot project to gather baseline cognitive data on every jockey racing in Kentucky. Mattacola spearheads the project, and starting with Keeneland’s Fall Meet this month, baseline cognitive and neuromuscular testing was mandatory for every mount.

Mattacola explains that most major professional sports – the NFL, the NHL, FIFA – have concussion protocols that guide decisions about when a player is healthy enough to return to play, but it’s difficult to copy their model exactly because each state – and sometimes each individual track – operates under different set of rules, so return to ride protocols aren’t consistent.

“Our group wants to create change in how we manage and assess concussions in horse racing, so we’re beginning local and we hope to use that data to develop a protocol that can be transferred to other states,” he says.

To illustrate how the data he’s collecting would be useful, Mattacola uses blood pressure as a metaphor.

“If we know what your blood pressure is this year and you come back and that changes, we can try to determine the underlying factors or the underlying mechanisms that contributed to that change,” he said. “Similarly, the baseline assessment provides additional information to the health care provider when a jockey falls, which can help him/her make a decision about whether to suspect a concussion.”

Establishing a strong rapport

Jockeys’ Guild National Manager Terry Meyocks said that the Equine Jockey/Rider Injury Prevention Initiative is a logical extension of the Jockey Health Information System (JHIS), a database that stores jockeys’ medical histories for access by racetrack medical personnel in the event of an injury.

“Our job is to protect jockeys by making sure that they operate in a safe racing environment,” Meyocks said. “As the issue of concussions has come to the forefront, we’ve made it a priority to educate our jockeys and find ways to protect them, which is in everybody’s best interest.”

At the Jockey’s Quarters on Keeneland’s opening day, the Clerk of Scales sends a jockey to Carolina Quintana, a certified athletic trainer and a doctoral student from the UK College of Health Sciences, who administers the SCAT-5 assessment tool, which gathers injury history and data related to cognitive and neuromuscular performance. Then the jockey completes several simple tasks, such as counting backward by threes and standing on one foot.

The jockey acts a bit sheepish as his friends look on in amusement, but this testing, which will be entered into his JHIS record, will be invaluable should he suffer a head injury.

There was not instant buy-in among jockeys, however, who were concerned that the project might affect their livelihood. But Mattacola and Quintana quickly won them over in a series of meetings as the pilot project took shape.

“We – but especially Carolina – have established a strong rapport with the jockeys and they now recognize that we are not here for any other reason than to help them. If they were to be injured, we would have the data to make a healthy decision on their behalf,” he said.

Building on previous research

This is not Mattacola’s first foray into the jockeys’ world. In 2015, he conducted a series of tests to determine how well several equine helmet models protected wearers from repeated impacts, which helped inform guidelines for replacing helmets after a fall and prompted the Jockeys’ Guild to reinforce that all riders wear ASTM-approved helmets. His work on helmet safety lent him credibility with the jockeys as he nudged the concussion pilot study to fruition. “It’s impossible to eliminate all concussions in sports, but we’re obligated to do what we can to prevent it, to recognize it when it occurs, and to keep the jockey’s long-term health and safety first in mind,” he said.

His next great chapter may well be applying the resources of the UK Sports Medicine Research Institute (SMRI), a state-of-the-art multidisciplinary research center dedicated to improving athletes’ performance and preventing injuries, to helping the jockeys.

 


sports physical therapy residency program

New sports physical therapy residency program begins at UK

When Morgan Lester tore her ACL in high school, she knew she wanted a career working with athletes. In 2016, Lester achieved her dream and completed her doctor of physical therapy, or DPT, at the UK College of Health Sciences.

When Lester completed her studies, she began working full-time as a physical therapist, but kept her eye on the sports physical therapy residency program taking shape at UK. The program was developed and created, and on Sept. 1, Lester became the program’s first resident.

Completing a residency program after earning a DPT is uncommon. There are thousands of physical therapy graduates each year, but there are far fewer accredited programs in the nation that offer a specialized residency. The sports physical therapy program at UK wants to change that, aiming to become the first accredited program of its kind at UK HealthCare.

Earning accreditation

The program is currently in a two-phase process to become accredited. The guidelines and requirements of the program have been set, and soon a team from the American Physical Therapy Association will observe Lester and her mentors in order to complete the accreditation process.

Ryan McGuire and John Jurjans, staff physical therapists and directors of the sports physical therapy residency program, worked with members of UK HealthCare, UK Sports Medicine and the UK College of Health Sciences’ physical therapy program to build a collaborative program.

“A team approach to rehabilitation is what works best for an athlete, and this is the best kind of program to demonstrate that,” Jurjans said.

A resource for her hometown

As part of her residency, Lester works with physicians, athletic trainers and physical therapists. She frequently works with Jenni Williams, an athletic trainer assigned to work with Lafayette High School athletics. This experience gives Lester the best opportunity to see an athlete’s journey from the initial injury, to physician diagnosis, physical therapy rehabilitation and return to play. Seeing multiple perspectives throughout the residency will better prepare Lester to work with injured athletes in a way that simply working in an office might not.

After completing the one-year residency, Lester plans to return to her hometown of Louisa, Ky., with her husband, who is a student in the UK College of Dentistry.

“When I was in high school and had my injury, I had to come all the way to Lexington to have functional testing and see the doctor,” she said. “I’m hoping to be a resource to the area so people don’t have to drive the 2½ hours to Lexington to get the care they need.”


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Making the Rounds with Dr. Vish Talwalkar

Ortho surgeon Vish Talwalkar on why he loves caring for kids

Making the RoundsWe sat down with Dr. Vishwas Talkwalkar, a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at Kentucky Children’s Hospital and Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center – Lexington, for our latest Making the Rounds interview. Dr. Talwalkar is a native Kentuckian and grew up right here in Lexington. Today, he specializes in treating a variety of orthopaedic concerns in kids of all ages.

When did you know you wanted to be a doctor?

I became interested in medicine at a pretty young age. Based on some of the things that my parents tell me, they thought I was going to be a doctor starting when I was in fourth or fifth grade.

My initial long-term plan was to play professional football and then come back and go into medicine. But that didn’t work out, so I ended up going straight into medicine.

What conditions do you treat?

I like to say that the patients I take care of come in all sizes and in all shapes. We see infants within the first few hours of life all the way up to patients who are 21 and older who have orthopaedic conditions that require our care as adults.

We take care of problems like hip dysplasia and spinal deformities of all different kinds. We also see children with cerebral palsy and other neuromuscular conditions, children with developmental diseases like Legg-Calve-Perthes disease or Blount’s disease, and children with bow legs and knock knees.

That’s part of the beauty of pediatric orthopaedics: We get to take care of such a broad variety of patients.

Why do you enjoy treating kids?

I like to take care of children because they’re so resilient and they’re so much fun. Every day, they seem to have a different funny story, and every day when I come to work, it’s always a little bit different, which makes it fun.

Orthopaedics is great because it allows you to impact patients in ways that you can see the results of what you’ve done. And with kids, you can see the results as they continue to grow up, which is very gratifying.

What does your ideal weekend look like?

My ideal weekend would be in the fall, doing what I call the Kentucky Triple Crown: You get up in the morning and play golf, and then go to Keeneland in the afternoon, and then go to a Kentucky football game at night.

What would you be doing if you weren’t a doctor?

If I wasn’t a physician, I’d probably be a high school biology teacher and football coach.

How would your friends and family describe you?

Probably as pretty easy-going and interested in a lot of things. Pretty passionate about the things I do. And as somebody who’s a good listener.


Watch our video profile with Dr. Talwalkar, where he explains the special connection between UK HealthCare and Shriners and what it means for our patients.


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knee replacement

Don’t fear knee replacement, says surgeon Dr. Stephen Duncan

Dr. Stephen Duncan

Dr. Stephen Duncan

Written by Dr. Stephen Duncan, an orthopaedic surgeon at UK Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine.

From simple wear and tear to an old high school sports injury, there are many reasons why you might develop debilitating knee arthritis that affects your daily life.

Over time, this arthritis causes the cartilage – protective cushion between the bones in your knee – to wear out. Unfortunately, once the knee cartilage has worn out, there are not great regenerative treatment options to help restore it.

At this point, you might be offered a knee replacement.

Fear of replacement

Once the word “replacement” is said, some patients fear the worst. And this fear prevents many individuals from going through with the surgery.

Although it takes about a year to fully recover from knee replacement, the truth is that the surgery can help you get back to enjoying the activities you love.

One common misconception is that knee replacement is only for older patients. That’s not the case. There isn’t a minimum age for knee replacement, and younger and older patients alike can undergo the surgery.

Surgery specifics

Another misconception about knee replacement is that we remove a large portion of the thigh bone (femur) or shin bone (tibia). Actually, we only remove about 5-9 millimeters of bone, which is about the size of a pen or pencil.

It’s almost better to think of knee replacement as a “recapping” or “resurfacing” procedure. We remove the worn-out portion of the cartilage and place caps of metal on the ends of the femur and the tibia.

This provides a strong surface to then place a plastic or polyethylene spacer in between these two surfaces. The replacement is often held to your bone with cement, which helps keep it in place.

Partial replacement

Another fear about replacement surgery is that it won’t last for very long.

Although early iterations of this surgery typically lasted around 10-15 years, the current implants are designed to last twice as long – between 20-30 years.

That means instead of having to wait until a patient is older, we can offer knee replacement to younger patients to help improve their quality of life earlier in life.

For some individuals, a partial knee replacement may be an option. This entails only recapping one part of the knee. If only one part is worn out, it doesn’t make sense to replace the entire knee, and a partial replacement might be a better option. Today, we’re doing more and more partial knee replacements to help improve patients’ pain and function.

Recovery

Regardless of the surgery, it does take about one year to fully recover and get back to trusting your knee to do activities such as hiking, jogging or tennis.

The good news is that you should be able to return to simple activities like shopping within four to six weeks after the procedure.

How we can help

The team at UK Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine offers a comprehensive knee replacement program, including advanced partial knee replacement techniques.

This year, the U.S. News & World Report’s Best Hospitals Rankings designated our program as High Performing in Knee Replacement. Learn more about our program and what you can expect during the knee replacement process.


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Making the Rounds with Dr. Ryan Muchow

Dr. Ryan Muchow on the ‘amazing’ field of pediatric orthopaedics

Making the RoundsWe caught up with pediatric orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Ryan Muchow for our latest Making the Rounds conversation. Dr. Muchow works at Kentucky Children’s Hospital and Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center – Lexington, where he specializes in hip surgery and hip preservation treatments. 

What conditions do you treat?

We treat the entirety of pediatric orthopaedics, from birth to the young adult years. We take care of all kinds of musculoskeletal injury and conditions.

We see kids at both the Shriners Hospital as well as the Kentucky Children’s Hospital. Most of the kiddos that we work with at KCH are kids that come in in an urgent or emergent basis with an acute injury. We’re able to take care of them at a time of great need as they’ve broken bones or have been involved in a serious accident.

Most of those kids at Shriners were either born with a condition or have developed a condition. They’ve been living with it for some time, and it’s not necessarily an acute or urgent setting. But we get to meet them and help them through their journey with whatever condition they have.

What makes pediatric orthopaedics so enjoyable?

It’s this amazing field where we have the opportunity to restore activity to kids. One of the top motivations for a child is to be able to play, to be able to run around and do things carefree. And we have the ability and opportunity to come in at a special time of their life and provide that service or need to get them to a point where they can do that activity.

Why did you decide to pursue medicine as a career?

Medicine in some ways chose me. I was thinking about other interests in high school, and someone recommended to me that I look at medicine. I got involved in a program that led me into medical school. After that, it was kind of affirmation after affirmation of, “Hey, being with people is awesome, getting to do the sciences is awesome.” And so it all kind of came together in medicine.

Describe your ideal weekend.

I’d come home Friday night after work and make pizza with my wife and kids. We’d put the kids to bed and then watch a movie.

Saturday morning, I’d get up and go for a run with the family, pushing the kids and running with my wife. We’d go get donuts, and then we love to do things outside – hiking, running around and doing crazy kid stuff.

What’s your favorite food?

If I can have two favorite foods, I’d say I like pizza a lot and I also like steak a lot. Those are two completely different foods, but those are where I’d go.

Steak if I could have a nice meal out and pizza if I could do something every day of the week.


Check out our video interview with Dr. Muchow, where he tells us more about the comprehensive orthopaedic care provided by Shriners and KCH.


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Pediatric patients play ball with UK athletes at No Limits camp

Don’t miss the video at the end of this post to see highlights from this year’s camp!

Patients from Kentucky Children’s Hospital and Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center Lexington learned there are no limits to what they can do at the No Limits Baseball and Softball Camps this past Saturday.

After moving to the UK medical campus on South Limestone earlier this year, Shriners needed a new venue for the annual No Limits event. UK Athletics stepped up to the plate, offering Cliff Hagan Stadium and John Cropp Stadium as well as some help from the members of the UK Baseball and UK Softball teams, including head coaches Rachel Lawson and Nick Mingione.

Throughout the day, patients had a chance to practice and develop their baseball and softball skills with drills in batting, catching, throwing and nutrition. A member of UK Baseball or UK Softball accompanied their “buddy” to each of the stations to help them one-on-one.

Fun on the field for patients and parents

JP David, who has participated in the No Limits Camp in previous years, was able to get in on the fun once again. For 12 years, David has seen physicians at Shriners and KCH to receive care for cerebral palsy. David’s mother accompanied him to the camp, as she’s done in previous years. She appreciates that Shriners gives patients the opportunity to have typical childhood experiences.

“He would love to just keep going but his body won’t let him,” she said. “But when they host events like this, he realizes he’s not the only one and he feels like a normal kid.”

For the first time, patients at KCH were also invited to participate in the camps. Jaxon Russell, a big fan of UK Baseball, was glad to be at Cliff Hagan Stadium. Russell has undergone two open-heart surgeries in the first five years of his life. He is also being treated for pulmonary atresia. His parents, Shannon and Miranda, were excited to be a part of the big day.

“For a program like this to take time out of their days to make these kids smile and have a memorable moment is tremendous,” Miranda said. “It’s something that they’ll never forget.”

After Jaxon’s diagnosis, Shannon and Miranda founded a nonprofit organization that helps other children diagnosed with heart conditions enjoy the game of baseball.

Long-lasting benefits

Illness can often take away the opportunity for young patients to have the same experiences as other children or their siblings. Sometimes things that happen outside of a clinical setting can be incredibly beneficial for health and wellness, said Dr. Scottie Day, physician-in-chief at Kentucky Children’s Hospital.

“The opportunity for a child to attend this camp gives them an experience that proves to have a long-lasting effect on psychosocial development, including self-esteem, peer relationships, independence, leadership, values and willingness to try new things,” he said.

Three patients who attended the camp also will have the opportunity to represent Kentucky in the 2018 Shriners Hospitals for Children College Classic next year in Houston, where they will serve as Kentucky’s batgirls/batboys during the tournament.


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hip replacement

Don’t let hip pain keep you down

Written by Dr. Patrick O’Donnell, an orthopaedic oncologist who treats bone cancer and also does reconstructive orthopaedic surgeries. 

When patients have hip pain and other treatment options aren’t providing relief, the next step is often a hip replacement surgery.

Hip replacement surgery can drastically improve your mobility, offer pain relief and allow you to get back to a more active lifestyle. Although it might sound scary, hip replacement is one of the most common and effective surgeries in medicine today. In fact, it’s one of my favorite surgeries because my patients tend to do so well afterward.

So, who’s a candidate for hip replacement and what can you expect during the procedure? Let’s find out.

What is a hip replacement?

The hip joint is a ball-and-socket joint formed by the acetabulum of the pelvis (the socket) and the upper-end of the femur, called the femoral head (the ball). Hip pain is frequently caused by arthritis in the hip joint. When arthritis damages the cartilage between the two bones, it can create friction in the joint, damaging both the femur and pelvis.

During hip replacement surgery, your surgeon will remove the damaged parts of the femur and pelvis and insert artificial replacements that allow your joint to move smoothly.

Who should consider a hip replacement?

Hip replacement is usually recommended for patients who have hip pain despite having tried other nonoperative treatment options. For many patients with end-stage arthritis, a replacement might be the best option.

Not everyone is a candidate for hip replacement, however. If you’ve had a history of infection, blood clots or pulmonary embolism, hip replacement might not be right for you.

How long does the procedure take and what’s recovery like?

Usually between 45 minutes and an hour. Many patients are able to walk soon after their surgery, though most people require about three months of rehabilitation before the hip joint is fully recovered.

I hear old myths about people not being able to walk after a hip replacement surgery, but the truth is that it’s a much easier recovery than other surgeries, such as knee replacements. We expect each of our patients to make a full recovery and return to the activities they love with reduced pain.

We can help

What makes UK unique is our breadth of care for anyone with hip pain.

We offer hip preservation treatments for patients who aren’t ready for a hip replacement, but we also have a team of surgeons who can take care of you, no matter what kind of surgery you need.


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