New Lexington Shriners facility

New Shriners facility enhances patient care, strengthens collaboration with UK

On Sunday, patients, medical center staff and doctors, donors, and UK HealthCare leaders came together to dedicate the new Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center Lexington facility, which opened earlier this spring on the UK HealthCare campus.

While healthcare providers at Shriners Medical Center and Kentucky Children’s Hospital have collaborated for decades, the opening of the new facility will better accommodate follow-up appointments for patients seeing multiple doctors for complex medical conditions.

“Shriners Medical Center moving to the UK HealthCare campus allows for seamless care to occur across institutional boundaries,” said Dr. Ryan Muchow, a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at Shriners and UK HealthCare. “The patients are benefited tremendously when two excellent institutions combine mission and service to advance the pediatric orthopaedic care.”

Continuity of care

When the new facility opened earlier this year, patients like Zayleigh Hancock were the first to benefit.

Zayleigh, a longtime patient at Shriners, was born with a complex medical condition called hemiplegia cerebral palsy (CP), a brain impairment that impacts a person’s ability to control movement and posture. Traveling to Lexington from her hometown of Morristown, Tenn., the 10-year-old has received ongoing treatment and numerous surgical interventions at both Shriners and KCH to improve her mobility and quality of life.

Earlier this year, Zayleigh’s head started slumping to the side, a symptom caused by overlapping bones in her neck. The condition required an inpatient surgical procedure at KCH and follow-up care and assessment at Shriners.

This close connection between KCH and Shriners, which is now connected by a pedestrian bridge to UK Albert B. Chandler Hospital and KCH, enabled seamless inpatient treatment and post-surgical care for Zayleigh. In addition, Zayleigh benefited from continuity of care, seeing familiar orthopaedic surgeons who have monitored her condition for years while also having access to advanced pediatric specialists at KCH.

A history of collaboration

Shriners has operated in Lexington since 1926. Transitioning from its former location on Richmond Road, Shriners now occupies 60,000 square feet of space on the bottom three floors of the new building on South Limestone. UK HealthCare leases the top two floors for ophthalmology services. The new Shriners includes a motion analysis center, 20 patient exam rooms, two surgical suites, a rehabilitation gymnasium, a prosthetics and orthotics department, therapy rooms, and interactive artwork. The energy-efficient building has geothermal heating and cooling, LED lighting and occupancy sensors, and automated equipment and controls.

UK HealthCare and Shriners have forged a longstanding collaborative relationship through years of service to Kentucky’s children. Pediatric specialists in the fields of orthopaedics, anesthesiology and rehabilitation serve on the medical staff of both organizations.

Mark D. Birdwhistell, vice president for administration and external affairs at UK HealthCare, called the new facility a win for UK, Shriners and the Lexington community.

“The building we are dedicating today will allow us to collaborate in a whole new way,” Birdwhistell said during the dedication, “bringing together Shriners Medical Center’s pediatric orthopaedic expertise and the Kentucky Children’s Hospital’s specialty and subspecialty care for children with complex conditions.”

Watch the video below to hear Dr. Henry Iwinksi, the chief of staff at Shriners and pediatric surgeon at UK HealthCare, discuss the longstanding relationship between Shriners and UK and what the new facility will mean for kids and families in the Commonwealth.


Next steps:

  • Learn more about the pediatric orthopaedic care provided by the experts at KCH and Shriners.
  • When your child is sick or hurt, you want the best care possible. That’s exactly what you get at Kentucky Children’s Hospital. Learn more about KCH.
Dr. Lattermann, director for Cartilage Repair and Restoration at UK HealthCare, spoke about what inspired his career in sports medicine.

Watch: 5 questions with sports surgeon Dr. Christian Lattermann

Each day brings something different for Dr. Christian Lattermann; that’s one of the things that keeps him passionate about his job.

As director of the Center for Cartilage Repair and Restoration at UK Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine, Lattermann treats patients, does community outreach, conducts research and mentors students.

Even though he’s a leader in the field, he says his patients teach him something new every day.

Watch this episode of “Five Questions” to learn how a semi-professional soccer career inspired Lattermann to become an orthopaedic surgeon and why he’s so excited about the sports medicine research happening here at UK.


Next steps:

  • Learn more about the UK Center for Cartilage Repair and Restoration, which offers operative and nonoperative treatments for a wide array of cartilage-related conditions.
  • After a torn meniscus and a failed surgery, marathon runner Lisa Hall was told she would need a knee replacement. Not willing to give up on her goals, Lisa turned to UK Sports Medicine and Dr. Lattermann for help. Read Lisa’s story.
Patty Lane had arthritis in her hip that prevented her from running. But Dr. Stephen Duncan offered a surgery that enabled her to continue to her passion.

After hip surgery at UK, triathlete pursues her passion without limits

When Patty Lane’s orthopaedic surgeon told her that her time as an endurance athlete was over, she was so upset she didn’t even tell her family.

The stiffness that she had been experiencing in her hip was diagnosed as arthritis, and she felt like her body had let her down. She contemplated what the diagnosis would mean and if she could be happy standing on the sideline at races. When she talked to her son’s triathlon coach about her diagnosis and prognosis, he gave her valuable advice: “Go see a surgeon who’s an athlete.”

Her research led her to Dr. Stephen Duncan, an orthopaedic surgeon at UK Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine who is also an avid cyclist. When Lane, who lives near Ashland, Ky., arrived for her appointment with Duncan, the options she received from him were “day and night” compared to what she’d heard originally.

“He told me he’d have me active again and gave me a variety of options I hadn’t been told about earlier,” Lane said.

Total hip arthroplasty

Duncan recommended a total hip arthroplasty, or THA, which involves removing the femoral head (the round top of the femur) and shaving off the cartilage inside the hip socket. A titanium shell is then placed into the socket, and a titanium stem is fitted inside the thigh bone. Finally, a plastic liner is placed inside the socket and a ceramic head is placed on the femoral component.

With a traditional THA, doctors discourage high-impact activities, as they increase the risk of fracturing and early wear. For Lane, Duncan used a newer technology called dual mobility, which uses a metal liner and two moving heads. This allows for less wear and tear, and decreases the risk of implant fracture. He also used a stem in her femur that has a special coating, which creates a natural connection between her femur bone and the implant. That helps prevent weakening of the bone in Lane’s femur around the stem, and also helps her avoid any pain in the femur that might be experienced with running.

Without Duncan, ‘I’d be done’

After six months of recovery, Lane was back to racing, winning her age group in a sprint-distance triathlon (half-mile swim, 12.4-mile bike, 3.1-mile run). In the time since, Lane has competed in more than 20 races, including the New York City Marathon, an ultra-marathon and multiple triathlons of varying distances.

Lane noticed early on in her journey that there was little information available about what it was like to return to endurance sports after a hip replacement or a surgery like hers. The few articles she found provided conflicting information or gave advice she didn’t feel was right. She read that you’re not the same athlete after hip surgery and that it would negatively affect her times. She also read accounts of how surgery had helped relieve stiffness and pain and led to better race results.

If Lane had listened to her first surgeon, she said, “I’d be done.” Duncan’s support and second opinion meant she could continue doing what she loved  being active and staying healthy.

“Get a second opinion, and find a doctor who is familiar with the sports discipline you’re interested in,” she said.

Duncan’s advice echoed Lane’s.

“I would recommend second opinions if someone is told that they need to give up their passion,” he said. “Whether it be cycling, golf, running or hockey, patients should know that there are surgical options that surgeons can tailor to fit each patient’s needs.”

There are a lot of places to find information about surgeons who may be able to help, he said.

“Seminars from surgeon leaders can be helpful,” Duncan said. “Patients themselves often are great advocates through word-of-mouth, online postings and online searches to find surgeons who are comfortable caring for these endurance athletes and have success getting patients back to their desired level of competition.”

If Lane hadn’t followed the advice of her son’s coach, she wouldn’t have been able to travel to Cozumel, Mexico, to compete as a member of Team USA Triathlon. Thanks to hard work and an unwillingness to give up, she will have the opportunity to compete in a duathlon (run, bike, run) in Canada this September. She has no limits on when she’ll have to stop competing and is excited to continue to compete (and win) races all over the world.

“[Duncan] knew how important it was to me to be active,” she said. “He was encouraging and had no hesitation that I’d be able to run again.”

Six months after her hip surgery, Patty Lane was back on her feet. She has since competed in more than 20 races, including the New York City Marathon, an ultra-marathon and multiple triathlons of varying distances.

Six months after her hip surgery, Patty Lane was back to racing. She has since competed in more than 20 races, including the New York City Marathon, an ultra-marathon and multiple triathlons.


Next steps:

A torn ACL results in a significant risk of developing arthritis within 10 to 15 years. If you've torn your ACL, be on the lookout for arthritis symptoms.

A torn ACL could lead to arthritis, writes UK orthopaedic surgeon

Written by Christian Lattermann, MD, director of the UK Center for Cartilage Repair and Restoration

Christian Lattermann, MD

A torn anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is one of the most common knee injuries, with as many as 200,000 cases per year in the U.S. Young people under the age of 20 are at particular risk, in part because of participation in sports.

Despite the frequency of torn ACLs, many people don’t know that the injury results in a significant risk of developing arthritis within 10 to 15 years. Around 70 to 80 percent of patients with a torn ACL will develop arthritis within that time frame. Because most ACL injuries occur in young people, this means that arthritis could set in at a very early age. If a patient is 15 years old when she tears her ACL, for example, she could be struggling with arthritis by the age of 30.

The increased risk of arthritis is true regardless of whether the ACL tear is surgically repaired or not. The actual injury, and the knee’s inflammatory response to the trauma, seem to be the culprits. The ACL is one of four main ligaments in the knee, connecting the thighbone to the shinbone, and any injury severe enough to tear the ligament is likely to affect other parts of the knee, as well. We also see bruises to the bone and damage to the cartilage, meniscus or other ligaments with about half of all ACL injuries.

At UK, doctors and researchers are currently trying to find ways to reduce the risk of arthritis by interrupting the inflammatory process in the week following the ACL injury. We hope that our research will lead to better long-term outcomes for patients who experience ACL tears.

If you’ve torn your ACL in the past, be on the lookout for signs of arthritis in your knee. Symptoms include pain and swelling with activity. If you’re experiencing these symptoms, it’s best to consult an orthopaedic sports medicine specialist, who will be trained in issues related to ACL injury and recovery.

If you’ve recently experienced an ACL injury, the most important thing for your recovery is adequate rehabilitation. The musculature around the knee joint is the biggest factor to prevent re-injury. The re-tear rate for ACL reconstruction under the age of 20 is around 20 to 25 percent, but a large portion of that can be prevented by being enrolled and trained in injury prevention rehabilitation.


Next steps:

UK Sports Medicine patient Lisa Hall

Runner chases Boston Marathon qualification with help of UK Sports Medicine

While teaching a fitness class in May 2012, Lisa Hall realized something was wrong with her knee.

After seeing an orthopaedic surgeon close to her home in Knoxville, Tenn., Hall was diagnosed with a tear in her meniscus, the soft disc of cartilage that cushions the knee. She underwent surgery to treat the injury and alleviate her pain so that she could continue to teach fitness classes and run. Her goal was to qualify for the Boston Marathon.

Unfortunately, Hall’s surgery was unsuccessful, and she developed bone-on-bone arthritis. In August 2012, she consulted with a second surgeon, looking for treatment options that could reduce her discomfort and allow her to continue her active lifestyle. It was then that she received some bad news: She was told she likely needed a knee replacement and that she should give up running.

Dr. Lattermann offers a solution

Christian Lattermann, MD

Hall refused to give up her dream of running the Boston Marathon, and a physician at Vanderbilt University referred her to Dr. Christian Lattermann at the UK Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine.

Lattermann specializes in treating injuries and other conditions that cause pain and degeneration of knee and shoulder joints. He recommended an osteotomy, a surgical procedure where a wedge of bone is removed from the tibia (shin bone) or femur (thigh bone) to realign the leg and shift weight from away from the area of the knee damaged by arthritis. In Hall’s case, the wedge was then filled with a bone graft and reinforced with a metal plate to support her knee.

Never one to shy away from a physical challenge, Hall completed physical therapy after surgery and was given the green light to use an indoor bike or elliptical to continue her recovery. Hall’s increased activity caused her knee pain to return, but it didn’t stop her from biking or participating in fitness classes again.

In May 2013, however, she felt a pop while performing a squat exercise and was forced to rest her knee with for five additional weeks after Lattermann surgically replaced the original plate supporting her knee.

Despite the setback, Hall followed Lattermann’s second rehabilitation instructions and returned to teaching group fitness classes. By December 2013, she was running on a special treadmill that reduced the impact of running on her knee joint. In March 2014, Hall competed in her first half marathon since her first surgery. She’s now completed two full marathons and several more half marathons.

“I really didn’t want a knee replacement, but no other doctor offered me anything else,” Hall said. “Dr. Lattermann offered me hope. I know that God led me to Dr. Lattermann and worked through him to allow me to run and teach again.”

In 2015, Lattermann removed the metal plate in her knee, and Hall continues to train. She missed her goal of qualifying for the 2017 Boston Marathon this past year by only two minutes.

‘Don’t give up’

The support Hall received from Lattermann and the care team at UK Sports Medicine is what keeps her returning to Lexington every six months for follow-up visits.

Lattermann’s advice for athletes hoping to maintain their level of activity is to talk about their goals with an orthopaedic surgeon who has expertise in both joint replacement and sports medicine. He also said it’s important for patients to understand the potential limitations of different treatment options.

“While one solution may allow high level of function, it may not allow complete pain-free activity,” Lattermann said.

Although Hall knows that not every surgical option works for every patient, she advises other patients to advocate for themselves.

“Keep searching, don’t give up – there are answers,” she said.


Next steps:

spring exercise

It’s spring! Get out and get moving

With more daylight and warmer temperatures beckoning, many people are ready to say goodbye to the winter doldrums and get active. If you’ve been holed up since Thanksgiving, however, lacing up your running shoes and heading out for a two-mile run may not be the best way to ease into a new exercise routine.

Spring is a great time to get moving, and our five-step guide can help you create a successful  and enjoyable  fitness plan.

Step 1: Talk with your doctor

Before you start working up a sweat, schedule a visit to your doctor to gauge on your overall health. Discuss any aches, pains or limitations that might impact your plans to get active. Talk about how to build a cardiovascular foundation that will lend itself to further activity.

Step 2: Make a plan

Exercise should be planned for a time in the day when you feel rested and have the most energy. If you are planning to exercise outside, avoid extreme temperatures (warmer than 85° F or colder than 32° F). Remember to dress appropriately for the weather and wear comfortable, supportive footwear. An indoor contingency plan for exercise can help you stay active even during spring showers.

Step 3: Warm up and cool down

Aerobic exercise, such as walking or biking, is recommended for those getting started with a new routine. Your exercise session should start with a warm-up period of slow walking or low-resistance bicycling and end with a cool-down segment at similar intensity. At the end of exercise, stretch the major muscle groups used by holding each stretch for 20-30 seconds. This can minimize injury and fatigue and increase flexibility.

Step 4: Make it manageable

Begin your exercise routine with an amount of time that is manageable, something as short as a five-minute walk around the neighborhood. Once you’re comfortable exercising for that long, slowly increase the duration of your sessions. Don’t push yourself too hard, either. You should be able to maintain a conversation at all times of exercise without experiencing breathlessness.

Step 5: Stay active

Exercise shouldn’t be a slog, so make sure you’re doing something that you enjoy and makes you feel good. A successful start of a new routine will keep you motivated to continue and progress. Fitness trackers and fitness apps are additional options to stay engaged and monitor progress. Enlisting a companion for exercise will add an element of support and keep the activity enjoyable.


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After experiencing a life-changing car accident, Baylee Booth underwent a miraculous recovery, allowing her to return to cheerleading.

Ky. high school cheerleader honored by UK Sports Medicine

A high school cheerleader who, in 2014, was severely injured in a car crash, has been named the UK Sports Medicine Comeback Athlete of the Year.

In June 2014, Baylee Booth, now a senior at Russell Independent High School in Greenup County, was in a car accident that changed her life. The accident left her with head trauma and multiple skull and facial fractures. She was in a coma for almost a week. The Comeback Player of the Year Award is given to a student-athlete who has overcome adversity that affected their ability to participate in Kentucky High School Athletic Association-sanctioned sports.

After the crash, Booth had to relearn how to walk, speak and feed herself. In the fall of 2014, Booth was able to return to the sport she loved – cheerleading. During the 2015-16 cheer season, Booth participated in competitions and was on the sideline cheering for her team at every game, including the girls state basketball tournament. She’s even back to stunting and tumbling practice twice a week.

“I would like to dedicate this award to people that have supported me since my TBI [traumatic brain injury]. Without my coaches, teachers, teammates, family, friends and countless medical professionals, I would not be here today,” Booth said. “They never gave up on me, and I would like to thank each and every one.”


Next steps:

Dr. Kim Kaiser not only serves patients in the UK Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine clinic, she’s also the team physician fora number of sports at UK.

Listen: UK team physician discusses working with student-athletes

Each year, college athletes flip, dunk and swim their way to wins and national titles. Working behind the scenes are countless staff members keeping these student-athletes healthy and in shape before, during and after their competitions.

UK’s Dr. Kim Kaiser is one of these specialists. She not only treats patients at the UK Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine clinic, she’s also the team physician for UK gymnastics, cheerleading, women’s soccer, swimming and diving, and volleyball and the sideline physician for women’s basketball.

In the latest episode of UK’s podcast Behind the Blue, Kaiser discusses how she works with athletes to ensure they’re in shape and feeling healthy for class and at game time. She also provides insights into how research being done at UK might help reduce and prevent the long-term effects of repeated head injury and concussion.


Next steps:

UK Shriners

UK Pediatric Orthopaedics, UK Advanced Eye Care moving into new Shriners building

The new Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center ‒ Lexington building on the UK HealthCare campus, which broke ground in March 2015, will open this spring.

In addition to Shriners, the building will be home to UK Pediatric Orthopaedics and will provide leased space for UK Ophthalmology (now renamed UK Advanced Eye Care).

Current locations of UK Advanced Eye Care along with the UK HealthCare Optical (formerly known as University Optical) will close March 17. They will reopen in the Shriners Building on March 20.

Pediatric orthopaedics patients will be seen in the new Shriners facility beginning April 17, although there will be a period of transition during which patients may be seen at either the current clinic within the Kentucky Clinic building or in the new Shriners space. During this transition, which is expected to last four weeks, parents whose children have a pediatric orthopaedics appointment are encouraged to call 800-444-8314 (toll-free) in advance to confirm where they will be seen.

Inpatient care for pediatric orthopaedics patients will be provided at Kentucky Children’s Hospital.

Members of UK health plans, including the UK-HMO and PPO/EPO options, will see no change in their copay/out-of-pocket charge with this move.

The new Shriners, which will be an outpatient surgical and rehabilitation center, was built on land that Shriners leased from UK. It remains a separate entity that is not owned or managed by UK.

UK Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine providers serve as the pediatric orthopaedic specialists for Shriners, an arrangement that has been in place since the 1970s.

The proximity of Shriners to Kentucky Children’s Hospital will facilitate collaboration of Shriners’ pediatric orthopaedic expertise and UK HealthCare’s specialty and subspecialty care for children with complex conditions.

Patients and families with appointments in the new facility will park in the UK HealthCare Parking Garage located just across Conn Terrace from Shriners. The building can be accessed via a pedestrian bridge at Level C of the garage.


Next steps:

Nutrition and athletic performance

Fuel your body like an athlete

Dr. Kimberly Kaiser

With spring fast approaching, many people will begin running races, playing tennis, hiking and enjoying other outdoor activities. It can be difficult to navigate the plethora of information on eating to improve athletic performance, but it is possible to make adjustments that work for you.

We sat down with Dr. Kimberly Kaiser, a doctor at UK Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine and UK Family & Community Medicine, to get the answers to some frequently asked questions about nutrition and athletic performance.

Should I eat before I exercise?

Your body needs energy in the form of calories to maintain exercise. However, too much food or the wrong food can cause gastrointestinal issues especially in endurance athletes.

As a general rule, the closer you are to a workout, the simpler the meal should be. If you eat two to three hours before exercise, food will have time to digest and be absorbed from the GI tract into the blood. A good pre-workout meal contains both complex and simple carbs, such as whole wheat toast with a banana or a smoothie made with Greek yogurt, granola and fruit.

What should I eat to help my body recover after exercise?

Dietary proteins are effective for the maintenance and repair of skeletal muscle proteins. They also serve as a source of energy in conjunction with carbs and fats. Eating whole foods high in protein like beef, poultry, fish, beans, nuts, eggs or dairy are better in general than supplementing. Typically, a well-balanced diet will eliminate the need to ingest extra protein.

Will fat help or hurt my performance?

Fat is a necessary fuel for endurance exercise along with carbohydrates. Your carbohydrate stores are depleted within one to two hours of strenuous exercise, so your body then uses fat as energy. Fats are also necessary to help absorb fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K.

Try to limit your how much saturated fat you consume. Eating too much can increase your risk for heart disease.

Do I need to take vitamins to perform better?

Eating whole foods whenever possible is ideal. A food diary can help identify if there are deficiencies in your normal diet that can then be supplemented under the direction of a physician and/or sports dietician. In general, taking a daily multivitamin is a safe way to ensure you are meeting vitamin and mineral needs. It’s important to remember that supplements are not regulated by the FDA; thus, most claims are not backed by scientific studies, and purity is not guaranteed.

We aren’t all destined for the Olympics, but many of us set our own athletic goals that we hope to achieve. By eating well, food can help you achieve those goals and make you feel like you won the gold!


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