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Owensboro Health joins Markey Affiliate Network

Owensboro Health has joined the UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network, enhancing cancer care available to patients in Western Kentucky and Southern Indiana and allowing them to stay closer to home and their support systems for most treatments.

Markey is the only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in Kentucky.

“Owensboro Health exists to heal the sick and to improve the health of the communities we serve,” said Owensboro Health President and CEO Greg Strahan. “When it comes to offering national-quality, outstanding cancer care, we are proud to team up with the UK Markey Cancer Center, which is recognized as one of the foremost cancer care and research centers in the nation.”

Owensboro Health’s Mitchell Memorial Cancer Center (MMCC) serves the health system’s coverage area, a population of nearly 400,000 people across 14 counties in Western Kentucky and Southern Indiana. More than 1,000 patients are treated at the center annually. Last year, Owensboro Health also joined Markey’s Research Network, which allows MMCC to run many of Markey’s clinical trials on-site.

“As a native of Owensboro, it is a great honor to welcome Owensboro Health as our newest UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate,” said Dr. Mark Newman, UK executive vice president for health affairs. “These relationships are very important to both of our institutions and most significantly to the care of patients throughout the region and the Commonwealth. We look forward to continuing to work with the outstanding team at Owensboro to provide the highest level of cancer treatment and prevention measures.”

The UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network was created to provide high-quality cancer care closer to home for patients across the region and to minimize the effects of cancer through prevention and education programs, exceptional clinical care, and access to research. The affiliate network is especially important for Kentucky, where cancer rates are the highest in the nation.

“Kentucky is home to some of the worst cancer rates in the country,” said Dr. Tim Mullett, medical director of the UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network. “Collaborating with our affiliate hospitals across the state will enable us to make a positive impact on the dire cancer rates here in the Commonwealth.”

Markey is one of only 69 medical centers in the country to earn an NCI cancer center designation. Because of the designation, Markey patients have access to new drugs, treatment options and clinical trials offered only at NCI centers.

Moving forward, the UK Markey Cancer Center is working toward the next tier of designation – an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. Currently, 45 of the 69 NCI-designated cancer centers in the country hold a comprehensive cancer center status. The UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network will play a large role in bringing that next level of cancer funding to Kentucky.

The affiliate network was created in 2006 and is made up of 20 hospitals across the Commonwealth of Kentucky.


Next steps:

  • Markey is Kentucky’s only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center, providing world-class cancer care right here in the Commonwealth. Learn more about why patients choose Markey for their cancer treatment.
  • Markey’s new state-of-the-art cancer care floor will allow our care teams to treat more patients with complex cancer diagnoses in an environment specifically designed for healing.

New year, new goals for UK grad student and cancer survivor

Meg Gravil has a few major goals for 2018. She wants to continue to build her level of fitness, and she plans to finish her dissertation by the end of the year.

But most importantly, Gravil wants to remain cancer-free.

As a UK College of Education graduate student studying interdisciplinary early childhood education, Gravil finished her qualifying exams in spring 2015 and began working on her dissertation. But just a few months later, her life ground to a halt.

After a regular annual exam, she was called back for a diagnostic mammogram and then a biopsy. Shortly after, she got a phone call from the UK Markey Cancer Center.

Diagnosis and recurrence

“I was sitting home on a Friday afternoon, and I had just five minutes to walk to go get my daughter from school,” Gravil said. “The phone rang. It was a nurse at Markey, and she said, ‘The results are positive. You have cancer.’”

The news came as a shock to Gravil, who was only 43 years old at the time and had no family history of breast cancer. She chose to have a bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction, performed in separate surgeries by UK’s Dr. Patrick McGrath and Dr. Brian Rinker.

“For peace of mind, I thought, take it all,” Gravil said.

Although the entire breast is removed during a mastectomy, the surgery isn’t a guarantee that the patient will remain cancer-free. Breast cancer can still return to the chest wall or nearby lymph nodes, known as locoregional recurrence, and an estimated 5 to 10 percent of women who undergo a mastectomy will experience a recurrence.

For Gravil, all was well at first. But just a few months later, she noticed a nodule that continued to get larger and redder. After having several doctors examine it, she received the bad news: The breast cancer had returned.

“I was absolutely stunned,” she said. “It was worrisome, because the recurrence was so soon after my initial diagnosis. The biggest part of that was thinking about my daughter – what if something happens to me? What effect will that have on my daughter’s life?”

Just one year after her initial surgery, Gravil was back in the operating room for surgery to remove the new tumor and install a port for chemotherapy. Chemo came next, and then radiation. The second time around, Gravil said, she was determined to do whatever it took to beat the disease. When her hair began falling out, she hosted a head-shaving party in her backyard with family and friends.

“The first time I was diagnosed, I was worried about losing my hair,” she said. “The second time, that was an afterthought – it was just, ‘I’ll do whatever I need to do to kick this thing.’”

Aiding recovery with exercise

While undergoing treatment at Markey, Gravil chose to participate in several programs at the UK Integrative Medicine & Health Clinic, including jin shin jyutsu and narrative medicine. Through Integrative Medicine & Health, she learned about LIVESTRONG at the YMCA, a free 12-week exercise program offered to cancer survivors. While attending Markey’s Expressions of Courage survivorship event last June, Gravil spoke with Corey Donohoo, director of community health at the Y, and decided to start the program in July.

Some of the most common side effects of cancer treatment include fatigue and weakness. Through the LIVESTRONG at the YMCA program, the certified trainers help survivors build up their strength and endurance based on their individual assessment and goals.

“At the beginning and end of the program, we do functional assessments, and we’re likely to see improvement,” Donohoo said. “But what’s really rewarding is to hear the stories of what these participants are able to do because of the program, like playing with their kids or grandkids, getting up and down, running errands, and more.”

Although Gravil is relatively active – she enjoys being outdoors and hiking – she hadn’t participated in any regular exercise routine in decades. Through the program, she got the opportunity to try a number of new fitness modalities, from learning to use the equipment on the floor of the gym, to TRX, yoga and Pilates Reformer.

And last September, she discovered that she was stronger than she realized, when she scaled a rock wall during a mother-daughter retreat at Life Adventure Center in Versailles. However, her newfound strength isn’t the only thing she’s gained.

“The big component wasn’t just feeling physically stronger and getting stamina back,” Gravil said. “The mental health and psychological benefits were really great for me.”

Regular exercise (and by extension, weight management) plays a significant role in maintaining the well-being of cancer survivors, according to Gravil’s oncologist at Markey, Dr. Aju Mathew. During treatment, it can help patients better tolerate their therapy. After completion of their treatment, it will improve functional capacity and promote healing.

Additionally, Mathew says, exercise may offer some protective benefits for survivors.

“There is increasing evidence that regular exercise can reduce the risk for cancer recurrence, as well,” Mathew said. “Overall, exercise and fitness training is a win-win for persons with a history of cancer.”

Looking forward

Throughout her journey, she says she’s been happy and confident in the care she received from her Markey physicians, nurses and staff.

“I was really impressed with the time that they took with me during my appointments,” she said. “I never felt like I was being rushed off – they answered all my questions to my satisfaction.”

With life more settled, Gravil already has momentum for her first two 2018 goals. She continues to go to the YMCA (Pilates Reformer is now her favorite class), and has begun the research and writing for her dissertation. If she finishes in December, she can walk to receive her PhD in special education next May.

And with her treatments at Markey complete – she finished her last dose of Herceptin in December – Gravil is looking forward to maintaining that most important goal of all.


Next steps:

  • Markey is Kentucky’s only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center, providing world-class cancer care right here in the Commonwealth. Learn more about why patients choose Markey for their cancer treatment.
  • Watch our Making the Rounds post featuring breast cancer specialist Dr. Aju Mathew, where he tells us about his newest hobby and which historical figure he most admires.
men's health month

Men, now’s the time to fine-tune your health

June is Men’s Health Month, which means it’s the perfect time to take a look at what men of all ages can do to live a heathier lifestyle.

From keeping your heart healthy to being proactive about cancer screenings, here’s what you can do to be the healthiest version of yourself:

  • Know your family’s medical history. Knowing your family’s health story can give you insight into what preventive actions you can take in order to stay healthy. Genetics can play a role in your risk for heart disease, Alzheimer’s, some cancers and osteoporosis. Check out a blog by UK Gill Heart & Vascular Institute’s Dr. Gretchen Wells for more about the benefits of knowing your family’s health history.
  • Be proactive about cancer screening. Regular cancer screenings can help catch early signs of the disease and find treatment options. The American Cancer Society recommends most men get regular screenings for prostate, lung and colon cancers at age 50. If you have a family history of cancer, talk with your healthcare provider about when you should start regular screenings.
  • Exercise regularly. Staying active will help to maintain a healthy weight, and it can also help reduce high blood pressure, high blood sugar and cholesterol. Aim for 30 minutes of moderate activity five times a week. Something as simple as a brisk walk or bike ride with a friend will work wonders for your overall health. Don’t know where to start? Check out our five-step guide to beginning a new exercise routine.
  • Stop smoking. Toxins in cigarettes can damage your lungs and can lead to lung cancer. Your heart takes a beating, too. If you do smoke, now’s the time to quit. Check out our guide for finally kicking your smoking addiction.
  • Talk to someone. Depression affects more than 6 million men in the U.S. Men are less likely to talk about how they are feeling, but it is important to know warning signs of depression and ways to find help and treatment. Learn more about the symptoms of depression and what you can do if you or a loved one needs help.
  • Don’t put off regular healthcare visits. You may feel perfectly healthy and not see the need to go to the doctor, but it is important to make sure you see a healthcare provider regularly. Some medical issues, like high blood sugar and high cholesterol, may not have any early symptoms, but a physician can provide diagnosis and treatment.
  • Stay social. If you’re having trouble sticking to a health regimen or just want some help in staying healthy, ask your friends and family join in on your new journey to a healthier life. You’re more likely to stick to your healthy lifestyle if you have support and others that can hold you accountable for your actions.

Although June is Men’s Health Month, it is important to remember that your health matters all year long. By making these simple lifestyle changes, you can have a lasting, positive impact on your health.


Next steps:

In 1987, Dr. John van Nagell began the Ovarian Cancer Screening Program. Now in its 30th year, the program is as successful and strong as ever.

Markey’s Dr. John van Nagell celebrates 30 years leading the Ovarian Cancer Screening Program

As a native Kentuckian, Dr. John van Nagell has always appreciated the impact UK has in the Commonwealth.

Van Nagell earned his undergraduate degree at Harvard University and his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania, but his goal was to return to Kentucky to practice medicine.

“I always wanted to come home,” van Nagell said. “And when it came time for me to decide where I wanted to undergo further training, the University of Kentucky had just opened an outstanding new medical center.”

Specializing in gynecologic oncology – the diagnosis, research and treatment of women’s cancers – van Nagell joined UK HealthCare as a resident in 1967, about 16 years before the creation of the UK Markey Cancer Center. He’s spent his career at UK treating patients and mentoring young doctors, but his lasting legacy will likely be his research.

In 1987, van Nagell started Markey’s Ovarian Cancer Screening Program, an ongoing research endeavor that provides free ovarian cancer screenings by transvaginal ultrasound to women across Kentucky.

‘Committed as ever’

Now in its 30th year, the program has provided free screenings to more than 46,000 women and found 775 ovarian tumors and 103 malignancies. Screenings are provided to women over the age of 50 and to those over the age of 25 who have a family history of ovarian cancer.

“We’ve been able to detect ovarian cancer at an earlier stage in many women, rather than just waiting for symptoms to occur,” van Nagell said. “The survival rate of women in our program who have ovarian cancer is roughly double that of women who didn’t get screened.”

Although the use of transvaginal ultrasound as a screening method has been controversial – with critics suggesting it may lead to unnecessary surgeries – van Nagell emphasizes that newer technologies such as molecular genetic testing will help doctors identify at-risk women who could most benefit from screening. The research program has also taught physicians more about finding malignancies, van Nagell said.

“We now know, because of this screening program, that certain ovarian cysts are always benign,” he said. “What we’re saying is more research needs to be done, and we’re doing it. And if we can provide free screening along the way to an at-risk population, that’s beneficial.”

With 50 years of experience at UK under his belt, van Nagell says he remains “as committed as ever,” still dedicated to perfecting the work he began three decades ago for his patients.

“All you have to do is go back into the clinic and see one case after another of ladies coming in with advanced ovarian cancers who had no early symptoms, and by the time their symptoms developed, their disease was incurable,” he said. “And the most fulfilling part is just seeing women who didn’t realize something was wrong but had a potentially fatal disease, which we were able to detect through screening, successfully treat, and now they’re fine.”

Dr. van Nagell honored by his peers

Regularly cited as one of the “Best Doctors in America,” van Nagell recently received another major accolade from his peers. Earlier this month, he attended the 2017 Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer in Baltimore, where he was presented with the Society of Gynecologic Oncology’s Distinguished Service Award. This award recognizes individuals who, over an extended period of time, display a continuous outstanding meritorious service in the field of gynecologic oncology.

“To be honored by your peers is very special,” van Nagell said. “And I believe that – at least in some small way – this validates what we have tried to do here, and that is to improve the early detection of a very serious disease. To me, it’s all about the lives of people who have been changed for the better by the screening program.”


Next steps:

To increase the number of preventive colorectal screenings, the UK Markey Cancer Center will follow a National Cancer Institute (NCI) initiative.

Markey joins national colorectal cancer screening initiative

The UK Markey Cancer Center is joining a National Cancer Institute (NCI) initiative aimed at improving colorectal cancer screening rates among men and women aged 50 and older from racially, ethnically and geographically diverse communities.

The national Screen to Save (S2S) Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative is led by the NCI’s Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities.

Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men and women combined. Kentucky’s mortality rate is among the highest in the country, and more than 800 people in the state die from the disease each year.

Markey’s Mindy Rogers, a community health educator, will collaborate with state and regional organizations and community stakeholders throughout Appalachian Kentucky to conduct the initiative’s culturally tailored education and outreach.

“Colorectal cancer is a screenable cancer. The earlier we can find the disease, the better the chances of survival,” Rogers said. “The intent of this initiative is to provide additional community and regional resources to aid our efforts to improve cancer screening rates and save lives. The S2S effort complements many of our existing colorectal cancer outreach programs conducted by colleagues at Markey and its affiliates, the Kentucky Cancer Program and our local health departments.”

S2S stems from research recommendations from the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel and will be supported by the Geographic Management of Cancer Health Disparities Program Region 1 North, led by Dr. Mark Dignan, the co-leader of Markey Cancer Prevention and Control.


Next steps:

Genetic counseling and family history

How your family history can help determine your risk for cancer

Written by Justine Cooper, a board-certified genetic counselor at the UK Markey Cancer Center.

Knowing your family history is a key part in understanding your risk factors for certain diseases. While you’re gathering with family this Thanksgiving, get to know more about your family’s health history and how it could impact your personal health.

Genetic counseling involves interpreting your family history and providing education about inheritance, testing options, management, prevention, resources and research. A genetic counselor can help you determine whether genetic testing may be appropriate for you or your family.

Genetic testing is available for many types of diseases, including cancer. Only 5 to 10 percent of cancers are hereditary. However, people with hereditary cancers have a much higher chance to develop cancer during their lifetime.

Typically, patients may be referred for genetic counseling if they have cancer diagnosed at a young age or if they have multiple family members who have had cancer, especially if the family members were diagnosed before 50 years of age. If you have a strong family history of disease, talk to your doctor about whether a referral to a genetic counselor might be appropriate.

The most well-known hereditary cancer test is testing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, which cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Angelina Jolie made headlines in 2013 when she announced that she had a BRCA mutation, prompting her to have a double mastectomy (removal of both breasts) and raising awareness of genetic testing for these genes.

We can also test for many other hereditary cancer syndromes. For example, Lynch syndrome increases a person’s chance to develop several types of cancers, including colon, endometrial (uterine), ovarian and pancreatic cancer. It’s estimated that the prevalence of HBOC and the prevalence of Lynch syndrome are equal and affect approximately 1 in 400 people.

There are many testing options, and a genetic counselor can help determine which test may be the best for you based on your personal and family history.

The cost of genetic testing can vary, based on whether we are testing just a few genes or a few dozen genes. The cost of a test can range from a couple hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. In the majority of cases, insurance does cover testing if you meet certain criteria set by your insurance company.

If a genetic counselor determines that genetic testing would be indicated, insurance is likely to cover the testing. Some insurance companies are now requiring genetic counseling prior to genetic testing.

If results show you have a higher chance to develop cancer, your health care team may recommend additional screenings or surgeries to find cancer as early as possible or prevent it from developing at all.

While knowing that you have a higher chance to develop cancer can cause worry and anxiety, it can also allow you to take charge of your health and take the steps needed to reduce the potential impact of this disease.


Next steps:

This one test could save your life

It’s a sad fact that Kentucky leads the U.S. in lung cancer incidence and mortality. If you smoke, live with a smoker or have smoked in the past, consider getting screened. Early detection is your strongest weapon against the disease.

What is lung cancer screening?

At the UK Markey Cancer Center, we use a low-dose CT scan to take many images of your chest and lungs. This allows a radiologist to look inside your lungs and identify suspicious spots that may be potential cancers.

Only low-dose CT scans – not chest X-rays – are recommended for lung cancer screening.

A suspicious or positive result means that the CT scan shows something that is abnormal. Additional tests will be done to determine whether this is cancer.

A negative result means that there were no abnormal findings at the time of the CT scan. It does not mean that you will never get lung cancer.

Who is qualified for lung cancer screening?

Lung cancer screening is recommended for patients who are at high risk for lung cancer, including those who:

  • Are ages 55-80, and
  • Currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years, and
  • Have a 30 pack-year smoking history, which means smoking one pack a day for 30 years or two packs a day for 15 years, and
  • Have no current symptoms of lung cancer.

A lung cancer screening does not prevent lung cancer, but it can detect cancer at an early stage, before you develop symptoms of the disease.

Lung cancer screening has been shown to decrease the risk of lung cancer death in patients who are high risk for developing cancer. When lung cancer is found early, many treatment options are available, which greatly improves the likelihood of survival.


Next steps:

  • To make an appointment with the UK Lung Cancer Screening Program, call us at 844-SCN-LUNG (844-726-5864). You must have a primary care physician to participate in a lung cancer screening.
  • If you’re a smoker, you probably already know it’s not a healthy habit. Check out our “Take action to stop smoking” blog post with tips to help you quit.
Lung cancer in Kentucky

We’re fighting back against lung cancer in Kentucky

There’s a No. 1 ranking we’re not proud of in Kentucky: leading the nation in lung cancer incidence and mortality. November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month and the perfect time to learn more about the disease and what UK HealthCare is doing to fight back.

At the UK Markey Cancer Center, we’re working hard to reduce the burden of lung cancer in Kentucky through screening and prevention, state-of-the-art treatment and research, and compassion for patients and their families.

Markey’s Multidisciplinary Lung Cancer Program  brings together a team of health care providers with expertise in all areas of lung cancer. We treat small cell lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, mesothelioma and other cancers of the chest and lungs.

Screening and diagnosis

Survival rates for lung cancer are much lower than other common types of cancer, with less than 18 percent of people with lung cancer surviving five years. That’s why it’s so important to catch the disease at its earliest. When we detect early-stage lung cancer, a patient’s chances of survival can be as high as 70 percent.

The UK Lung Cancer Screening Program is available for patients who might be at risk for lung cancer, including smokers and former smokers, and can help identify lung cancer early on, before symptoms are noticeable.

Treating lung cancer

When a patient is diagnosed with lung cancer, we act fast to find a course of treatment that’s best for that person. Each treatment plan is based on the individual’s unique needs and the specifics of their cancer.

Surgery, radiation and chemotherapy treatments at Markey are state-of-the-art and are supplemented by national research studies as well as treatments with promising new drugs.

To make an appointment at the Multidisciplinary Lung Cancer Program, call 859-257-4488 or use our secure online appointment form.


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Tomosynthesis at UK HealthCare

Advanced technology for breast cancer screening

Is it time for your annual breast cancer screening? Do you need diagnostic imaging? Here’s something to consider.

The Comprehensive Breast Care Center (CBCC) at the UK Markey Cancer Center offers state-of-the-art digital tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening and diagnostic services. UK HealthCare is one of only a few medical centers in the state to offer this new technology.

Tomosynthesis is 3-D technology that allows radiologists to see individual breast structures without overlapping tissue. In addition to providing the traditional top and side images of the breasts taken during a regular 2-D mammogram, tomosynthesis allows the technologist to take X-ray pictures of each breast from many angles. A computer then combines all this information into one 3-D image, making it possible to find much smaller and earlier-stage cancers. A tomosynthesis exam will feel no different from a usual mammogram, except that it takes just four seconds longer.

Dr. Margaret Szabunio, associate medical director of the CBCC and division chief of women’s radiology at UK HealthCare, along with her team of dedicated breast radiologists, specialize in using tomosynthesis for the early detection of breast cancer.

“Tomosynthesis produces images in tiny 1 millimeter slices that can be reconstructed into a 3-D image of the tissue, similar to the way a CT scan works,” Szabunio said. “It allows us to look at breast tissue in a way we’ve never been able to before.”

Dr. Mark Evers, director of the UK Markey Cancer Center, says the technology, along with Szabunio and her team’s expertise, have a significant impact on patients.

“Dr. Szabunio’s experience with tomosynthesis digital breast imaging is of great benefit to our patients when it comes to detecting breast cancer in its early stages,” Evers said. “The earlier a cancer is detected, the higher a patient’s chances are for a full recovery. This technology has the potential to save many, many lives.”

The CBCC uses tomosynthesis as a regular screening tool for all women, women who are at a high risk for breast cancer or for women that need diagnostic follow-up for a mammogram that shows an abnormality.

Make an appointment with the CBCC by calling 859-323-2222 or visiting our online appointment request form.


Next steps:

  • Confused about when to get a mammogram? Check out our Q&A with Dr. Szabunio, who tells us why mammograms are so important and what she recommends when it comes to screening.
  • Our latest Making the Rounds blog featured breast cancer specialist Dr. Aju Mathew. He tells us about his newest hobby and which historical figure he most admires. Check it out.
Dr. Douglas Andres

UK lung cancer study picks up after 15 years

In the late 1990s, University of Kentucky Professor Douglas Andres found that mutations in a protein known as RIT1 could initiate cancer development in laboratory models.

RIT1 works as a molecular switch. In response to signals from outside the cell, it turns on fundamental cellular activities, and then turns them off again to ensure they don’t continue unchecked.

“Proteins like RIT1 control everything from how cells differentiate to how they grow,” Andres said. “In a disease like cancer, they often get broken in the ‘on’ position. The cells that have RIT1 mutations constantly grow, even though they don’t receive the necessary signals from the environment.”

When Andres applied for funding to follow up on his findings, his application was declined. The reviewers of his grant wanted evidence that RIT1 mutations might actually promote cancer development in people. Unfortunately, searching for RIT1 mutations in human tumors was, at that time, a difficult undertaking. The technological advances required to successfully complete this mission would not be made until several years later.

But Andres didn’t lose hope.

“I never really give up on anything,” he said.

Just over a year ago, his patience was rewarded – Alice Berger, a postdoctoral researcher in the laboratory of Professor Matthew Meyerson at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, provided the evidence he needed. Working collaboratively, the research teams led by Andres and Meyerson showed what Andres had hypothesized all along: RIT1 mutations present in human lung cancers can transform non-cancerous cells into cancerous ones.

Now, after waiting more than 15 years, Andres has finally been awarded the funds to expand upon his initial discovery. Specifically, the breakthroughs gained from his collaboration with Meyerson helped him secure a two-year, $150,000 grant from the Kentucky Lung Cancer Research Program.

“With the grant we received, we will push the work forward,” Andres said. “We hope this will lead to greater understanding of RIT1 mutations and how tumors containing them may differ from other lung tumors.”

Ultimately, Andres hopes to use the insight obtained from these efforts to develop new tests that can diagnose RIT1-mutant lung cancers in patients. The awareness gained from such efforts could potentially lead to the development of therapies that specifically kill cancer cells containing RIT1 mutations.

“Each time that we gain fundamental insight into a problem – that is an exhilaration,” Andres said. “Sometimes it happens in six months of work, or, in this case, it’s taken 15 years between our initial discovery and our ideas actually coming to fruition.”


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