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pediatric heart care

Watch: KCH, Cincinnati Children’s provide pediatric heart care close to home

Kentucky Children’s Hospital and Cincinnati Children’s Heart Institute joined forces last year to provide advanced pediatric heart care close to home for patients in Kentucky.

It’s a collaboration that combines the strength of UK HealthCare’s advanced pediatric and adult congenital heart care with Cincinnati Children’s nationally ranked experts in pediatric cardiac care and surgery.

The program is a collaboration at every level, says Dr. James Quintessenza, chief of pediatric cardiothoracic surgery at UK HealthCare. World-class heart surgeons at Cincinnati Children’s Heart Institute work together with cardiology experts at Kentucky Children’s Hospital to provide the full spectrum of high-quality heart care – from assessment and diagnosis to complex surgery and post-surgical care.

We caught up with Dr. Quintessenza and Dr. Scottie Day, interim chair of the UK Department of Pediatrics and physician in chief at Kentucky Children’s Hospital, to learn more about the exciting collaboration. Watch below and find out how experts at UK and Cincinnati Children’s are helping kids and families across the region.


Next steps:

  • Learn more about the pediatric heart care collaboration between Cincinnati Children’s Heart Institute and Kentucky Children’s Hospital.
  • When your child is sick or hurt, you want the best care possible. That’s exactly what you get at Kentucky Children’s Hospital. Learn more about KCH.

Pediatric patients play ball with UK athletes at No Limits camp

Don’t miss the video at the end of this post to see highlights from this year’s camp!

Patients from Kentucky Children’s Hospital and Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center Lexington learned there are no limits to what they can do at the No Limits Baseball and Softball Camps this past Saturday.

After moving to the UK medical campus on South Limestone earlier this year, Shriners needed a new venue for the annual No Limits event. UK Athletics stepped up to the plate, offering Cliff Hagan Stadium and John Cropp Stadium as well as some help from the members of the UK Baseball and UK Softball teams, including head coaches Rachel Lawson and Nick Mingione.

Throughout the day, patients had a chance to practice and develop their baseball and softball skills with drills in batting, catching, throwing and nutrition. A member of UK Baseball or UK Softball accompanied their “buddy” to each of the stations to help them one-on-one.

Fun on the field for patients and parents

JP David, who has participated in the No Limits Camp in previous years, was able to get in on the fun once again. For 12 years, David has seen physicians at Shriners and KCH to receive care for cerebral palsy. David’s mother accompanied him to the camp, as she’s done in previous years. She appreciates that Shriners gives patients the opportunity to have typical childhood experiences.

“He would love to just keep going but his body won’t let him,” she said. “But when they host events like this, he realizes he’s not the only one and he feels like a normal kid.”

For the first time, patients at KCH were also invited to participate in the camps. Jaxon Russell, a big fan of UK Baseball, was glad to be at Cliff Hagan Stadium. Russell has undergone two open-heart surgeries in the first five years of his life. He is also being treated for pulmonary atresia. His parents, Shannon and Miranda, were excited to be a part of the big day.

“For a program like this to take time out of their days to make these kids smile and have a memorable moment is tremendous,” Miranda said. “It’s something that they’ll never forget.”

After Jaxon’s diagnosis, Shannon and Miranda founded a nonprofit organization that helps other children diagnosed with heart conditions enjoy the game of baseball.

Long-lasting benefits

Illness can often take away the opportunity for young patients to have the same experiences as other children or their siblings. Sometimes things that happen outside of a clinical setting can be incredibly beneficial for health and wellness, said Dr. Scottie Day, physician-in-chief at Kentucky Children’s Hospital.

“The opportunity for a child to attend this camp gives them an experience that proves to have a long-lasting effect on psychosocial development, including self-esteem, peer relationships, independence, leadership, values and willingness to try new things,” he said.

Three patients who attended the camp also will have the opportunity to represent Kentucky in the 2018 Shriners Hospitals for Children College Classic next year in Houston, where they will serve as Kentucky’s batgirls/batboys during the tournament.


Next steps:

Dr. Scottie Day

Meet pediatrician Scottie Day: ‘Caring for the sickest of the sick’

Making the RoundsDr. Scottie Day, associate chief medical officer at Kentucky Children’s Hospital, is the featured physician in this week’s Making the RoundsA graduate of the UK College of Medicine, Dr. Day worked in Indiana, Ohio and Hawaii before returning to Lexington in 2011. He now works at KCH in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU).

When did you know you wanted to be a physician?

As a child growing up in Eastern Kentucky, I always wanted to be a physician. And I held true to that. I think that I always felt like I wanted to be in some type of servant position.

Why did you choose pediatrics as your specialty?

I originally couldn’t decide on a specialty and wanted to take care of children and adults, which led me to do my residency in internal medicine and pediatrics. However, as I went through residency, I realized I wanted to take care of the sickest of sick of children.

Working in the PICU gave me a chance to take care of small babies all the way up to older teenagers and even some young adults with childhood diseases. It took my internal medicine-pediatrics resident training and allowed me to use this knowledge to take care of the most critically ill. There is nothing more rewarding.

What makes you want to come to work every day?

As a PICU physician, each morning I do what I love most: take care of the sickest children and their families with an amazing team and fulfill my calling and talents that I have been blessed with. The stresses are high, but the rewards are priceless.

How would your friends describe you? 

Easygoing, friendly, talkative. Conscientious about others’ feelings, wanting to do every single thing, never saying no.

Do you have any guilty musical pleasures?

I listen to all music. I play music myself; I’ve played since I was 5 years old. Piano, guitar, mandolin, ukulele, drums. I listen to every single type of music.

What is your favorite aspect about living in Lexington? 

It’s got the small-town community feel, but it still has some big city pleasures. I’m originally from Kentucky, and when I moved back to Lexington, I liked being in a college town. I feel like there’s a huge sense of community here.


Watch our video interview with Dr. Scottie Day, where he talks about his patient care philosophy.


Next Steps

  • Experts at the KCH PICU take care of critically ill children with a range of medical issues, including burns, trauma injuries, and cardiovascular and neurological concerns. Learn more about our state-of-the-art services.
  • When your child is sick or hurt, you want the best care possible. That’s exactly what you get at Kentucky Children’s Hospital. Learn more about KCH.