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UK researcher using $2.9M grant to treat cocaine-use disorder

Does reducing the use of cocaine, but not abstaining from the substance entirely, produce health benefits? There’s currently little research available that answers that question.

William Stoops, PhD, professor in the UK College of Medicine and director of regulatory knowledge and support for the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science, has received a $2.9 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to find more answers.

Stoops hopes his research will contribute to the evolving knowledge of treatment for cocaine-use disorder (CUD), a substance-use disorder that currently has no well-established treatment methods.

“Facilities treating cocaine-use disorder are doing what they can, but there is no common practice,” Stoops said.

And while medications are available for other common substance-use disorders including opioid-use disorder and alcohol-use disorder, no medication is available to treat CUD.

Finding a more successful treatment model

Another challenge is that under the current model, CUD treatment is considered “successful” only if a patient abstains entirely from using the substance. Stoops points out that although abstinence is the ideal outcome, such a “total” fix is not the same measure of success used in treating other chronic diseases.

“Abstinence may be too high of a bar to set. We don’t do that with other chronic diseases – we focus more on reduction or management, like when treating someone for high blood pressure,” he said.

Stoops, along with interdisciplinary team members from the departments of behavioral science, psychiatry, internal medicine and psychology at UK, hope to determine if reduced cocaine use confers health benefits to individuals with CUD. He hypothesizes that a reduction will lead to improved health, and abstinence will yield even more benefits.

Health and economic benefits

The study will take place over five years and aims to enroll 200 participants (about 40 per year). Participants, who must be between 18 and 65 years old, will be asked to participate in a 12-week intervention. During the intervention, participants will need to be available three days a week for short visits. After the initial 12-week period, there will be long-term follow-up. The clinical component of the study will be conducted through the clinical services unit of the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

In addition to helping people manage and treat their CUD, Stoops and the research team are also aware of the economic benefits to more people entering recovery.

“Substance use disorders in general, and CUD specifically are very expensive to the taxpayer. They lead to billions of dollars in lost productivity and healthcare costs each year,” Stoops said.

“Not having an effective, broadly used treatment, combined with the lack of a strong evidence base about whether reduced cocaine use can confer benefit, hampers our ability to help people with CUD.”

If you are interested in participating in or learning more about the study you can find more information at clinicaltrials.gov.


Next steps:

  • Researchers are working hard to identify new treatments and strategies to improve health, but they need healthy participants and those with medical conditions to participate in clinical studies. Find out how you can participate in clinical research at UK HealthCare.
  • Read how UK researchers are using an NIH grant to fight drug abuse in rural Kentucky.

UK researchers awarded NIH grant to fight drug abuse in rural Kentucky counties

The National Institutes of Health recently awarded the UK Center for Health Services Research (CHSR) funding to study the adoption of syringe exchange programs in rural communities in the Appalachian region of Kentucky.

Rates of opioid use disorder and injection drug use have risen significantly in Kentucky, especially in rural communities. The serious health consequences of injection drug use include the spread of both hepatitis C and HIV. Kentucky is home to eight of the 10 counties in the nation that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified as most vulnerable to an outbreak of HIV.

CHSR’s focus on community efforts to end health disparities in underserved areas aligned closely with the NIH funding opportunity to examine drug use interventions.

The two-year National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded study is designed to reach vulnerable injection-drug users in Clark, Knox and Pike counties. The goal is to understand the many barriers that drug users face in accessing syringe exchange programs and to identify priority intervention targets.

The project’s principal investigator, Hilary Surratt, associate professor in the UK College of Medicine, is working closely with the Clark, Knox and Pike county health departments to gather data from drug users, health department staff, treatment providers and law enforcement.

This data will inform changes to policies and practices of syringe exchange programs and develop prevention strategies to enhance access and utilization of these programs in rural areas.


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UK brings expertise to national summit on opioid drug crisis

Addiction researchers, clinicians, intervention coordinators and health policy leaders from UK and UK HealthCare are taking part in a national conversation this week focused on combating the opioid drug crisis.

The National Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit, taking place April 17-20 in Atlanta, is the largest national collaboration of professionals from local, state and federal agencies, business, academia, treatment providers, and allied communities impacted by prescription drug abuse and heroin use. It was introduced in 2012 under the leadership of Operation UNITE and U.S. Rep. Harold “Hal” Rogers (KY-5th) with the purpose of alleviating the burden of illegal substance abuse through comprehensive approaches. In this regard, UK leads the way.

Last year alone, investigators in the UK Center on Drug and Alcohol Research received $9.6 million for projects dedicated to substance abuse and addiction. Since 2010, the National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded more than $92 million to UK research projects. UK HealthCare is proud to support the summit through sponsorship.

“UK is uniquely positioned to confront these questions because of its multidisciplinary research endeavors, leading academic medical center and regional referral network deployed to confront the scourge of opioids. We’re committed to working in – and with – communities to help navigate the complex nature of critical policy changes and effective healthcare implementation,” UK President Eli Capilouto said.

Kentucky’s rate of opioid overdose death remains above the national average, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting 1,273 Kentucky overdose deaths in 2015.

“The opioid epidemic is far-reaching and multifaceted, leaving a void in each family and community it scars,” Capilouto said. “Kentucky families and communities throughout Appalachia know the devastation and havoc of addiction. That’s why this question is critical to UK researchers who lead the research, healthcare and policy questions surrounding opioid abuse.”


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