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Registration open for third-annual neurogastronomy symposium

Registration is now open for the third annual International Society of Neurogastronomy Symposium, which will be held at UK on March 2-3, 2018.

Both day’s events offer continuing education credit.

This year’s symposium will explore the connection between brain and behavior in the context of food.

Luminaries from the worlds of science, nutrition and culinary arts will share their knowledge on a variety of topics, including the psychological influences on eating and behavior, the chemosensory properties of food and how we experience them, the role of food as medicine and the history and evolution of flavor and flavor perception.

The term neurogastronomy was coined by Dr. Gordon Shepherd, professor of neurobiology at Yale University – first in 2006 in an article in Nature and six years later in an eponymous book. While Dr. Shepherd has been interested in the concept from a research perspective, a group of neuroscientists, chefs and food scientists are enthusiastic about making it a clinical translational science, with applications in cancer, stroke, and brain injury (which can destroy the sense of taste) as well as diseases like obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

The day’s format differs from the typical symposium, featuring brief presentations modeled after the popular TED talks and punctuated with breaks for tastings and a contest where food prepared by nationally acclaimed chefs Taria Camerino and Jehangir Mehta will be judged by UK HealthCare patients with diabetes.

Here is a link to video highlights from last year’s symposium.

This year, there is an experiential event on Friday, March 2: a five-course dinner with wine pairings by world-class sommelier Francois Chartier and bourbon flavor wheel instruction by Chris Morris, Master Distiller at the Woodford Reserve, plus interdisciplinary clinical neuroscience lectures.

For more information about the symposium, including a full list of speakers and how to register, visit isneurogastronomy.org.


Next steps:

 

DASH diet

The DASH diet is easy to follow and good for your health

Do you want to eat better, but don’t know where to start? Consider the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH diet.

The DASH diet was initially created to help lower blood pressure. But studies have also found the DASH diet to be one of the best options to prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes and even some forms of cancer. Research also shows the DASH plan is safe and effective for short-term and permanent weight loss.

The best news is the DASH diet is easy to follow because it does not restrict entire food groups. Because the plan focuses on fresh fruits and veggies, controlling your calories is easier, too. Learn more about the DASH diet below.

What is the DASH diet?

The DASH plan is promoted by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. The plan helps reduce the risk for serious health problems because it is low in:

  • Saturated fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Total fat
  • Red meat
  • Sweets
  • Sugary beverages

The DASH diet encourages:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Fat-free or low-fat milk and dairy products
  • Whole-grain foods
  • Fish
  • Poultry
  • Nuts

The DASH diet is also rich in important nutrients such as:

  • Potassium
  • Magnesium
  • Calcium
  • Protein
  • Fiber

Tips for following the DASH diet

To reduce the amount of sodium in your diet, try these steps:

  • Choose fresh, frozen or canned vegetables that have low sodium or no added salt.
  • Use fresh poultry, fish or meat instead of canned, smoked or processed options.
  • Limit cured foods such as bacon and ham, foods packed in brine, and condiments.
  • Cook rice or pasta without salt.
  • Cut back on frozen dinners, packaged mixes, and canned soups or broths.
  • Rinse canned foods such as tuna and canned beans to remove some of the salt.
  • Use spices instead of salt to flavor foods.
  • Add fruit to breakfast or have it as a snack.
  • Treat meat as one part of the whole meal, instead of the main focus.

Some days you might eat more sodium or fewer foods from one group than the plan suggests. But don’t worry. Try your best to keep the average on most days close to the DASH plan levels.

Following the DASH diet

Here’s how much of each food group you should eat every day, based on eating 2,000 calories per day.

6-8 servings of whole grains. A serving size is about one slice of bread, 1 ounce of dry cereal or 1/2 cup of cooked rice or pasta.

4-5 servings of vegetables. A serving size is about 1 cup of raw, leafy vegetable or a 1/2 cup of cut-up raw or cooked vegetables.

4-5 servings of fruits. A serving size is about one medium fruit; 1/4 cup of dried fruit; 1/2 cup of fresh, frozen or canned fruit; or 1/2 cup of real fruit juice.

2-3 servings of fat-free or low-fat dairy. A serving size is about 1 cup of milk or yogurt or 1 1/2 ounces of cheese.

Up to 6 servings of lean meat, poultry, fish. A serving size is about 1 ounce of cooked meat, poultry, or fish, or one egg.

4-5 servings per week of nuts, seeds, legumes: A serving size is about 1/3 cup or 1 1/2 ounces of nuts, 2 tablespoons of peanut butter, 2 tablespoons or 1/2 ounce of seeds, 1/2 cup of cooked, dry beans or peas.

2-3 servings of fats and oils: A serving size is about 1 teaspoon of soft margarine, 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil, 1 tablespoon of  mayonnaise or 2 tablespoons of salad dressing.

Up to 5 servings per week of sweets: A serving size is about 1 tablespoon of sugar, 1 tablespoon of jelly or jam, 1/2 cup of sorbet or gelatin or 1 cup of lemonade.


Next steps:

Chandler Dining

Come enjoy the new Chandler Dining!

Chandler Dining, UK HealthCare’s new state-of-the-art dining experience, opened its doors to the public on Monday.

Our new dining space is unlike any hospital cafeteria you’ve seen before, and we want you to stop by to enjoy the tasty meal options our chefs are creating. Chandler Dining is open not only to patients, families and staff, but to the public as well. Stop by and enjoy a great meal!

Located on the first floor concourse of Chandler Hospital Pavilion A, Chandler Dining is open 22 hours a day, featuring nine food stations, eight checkout lines and several other unique features.

Stations:

  • Italian Tratttoria (pizza, pasta, flatbread)
  • Deli (freshly carved meats)
  • Chef Table (exhibition station)
  • Traditions (traditional home-cooked meals)
  • Chop Chop (made-to-order signature salads)
  • Salad/Soup Bar
  • Southwestern Grill (hamburgers, grilled cheese, French fries, chicken, fish)
  • Sushi
  • Starbucks Coffee

Features:

  • Stone hearth oven
  • Chef Table (featuring five interchangeable cooking display units)
  • Teaching kitchen
  • Global menu offerings
  • Healthy and sustainable initiatives
  • Specialty made-to-order coffee drinks and smoothies
  • Menus on digital screens
  • Fresh carved meats at deli
  • Local artwork in the dining area
  • Water container filling station in the dining area

Chandler Dining hours of operation:

  • Breakfast: 6-10 a.m.
  • Closed: 10-11 a.m.
  • Lunch: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Light lunch: 2-4 p.m.
  • Dinner: 4-7 p.m.
  • Late night: 7 p.m. to 5 a.m.

Check out the video below to see our chefs in action and learn more about the Chandler Dining experience.

mindful eating

Mindful eating can help you lose weight permanently

Losing weight is difficult, and keeping it off can be even harder. Many people regain the weight because typical weight loss diets involve drastic, unsustainable changes. But, learning to eat “mindfully” can fundamentally shift our relationship with food for long-term weight loss maintenance.

In our busy, convenience-oriented lives, eating has become an automatic behavior. Research shows we make more than 200 eating decisions daily, but we sometimes don’t take time to think about them. Instead, we often eat mindlessly, or out of habit. In a culture where we are surrounded by unhealthy food options, this has understandably led to a lot of weight gain.

Mindfulness means paying attention, on purpose, to the present moment — without placing judgment. Mindfulness-based approaches have been used with success in the treatment of health issues like stress, depression, eating disorders and chronic pain. When we apply mindfulness to eating, it helps us support our long-term health and well-being, because we learn to slow down and recognize when we’re truly hungry and when we’ve had enough to eat.

It’s not about meditating over breakfast — but about continually paying attention to how food affects us, so that we can make better eating choices. With gentle and attentive practice, we can reprogram the behaviors and reactions that cause us to eat mindlessly. This can lead to lasting changes from to how we react when there’s food in social situations to how we shop for and prepare food.

It might seem daunting to learn eat mindfully, but with practice it can become a habit. Here are few tips and resources to get started:

  • Before you eat, stop and ask yourself why you’re eating. Is your body actually hungry?
  • Your stomach is about the size of your clenched fist, so try to eat just that amount at one time. It actually takes 20 minutes for the brain to recognize that you are full, so try to wait before getting a second helping.
  • Pay attention to physical signs of hunger and fullness. Eat when you’re slightly hungry (not starving), and stop when you don’t feel hungry anymore (not full or stuffed).
  • Take time to look at your food, smell your food and taste your food more slowly to really experience it.
  • Minimize distractions (like screens) while eating. Sit down and focus your attention only on your food and your body.

For more information, some useful resources include The Mindful Diet from Duke Integrative Medicine and the Am I Hungry? Mindful Eating Program.

Written by Teresa Lee, RD, LD, a teaching assistant in the University of Kentucky Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition.


Next steps:

  • Researchers at the University of Kentucky are looking for people who are interested in participating in a study about how mindfulness affects weight loss. For details, please contact Teresa Lee at 859-619-3640 or teresalee@uky.edu or visit ukclinicalresearch.com.