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Following a few grilling safety tips can keep the focus on good food and fun, not on first-aid.

Planning a cookout? Follow our grilling safety tips

Cookouts and barbecues are a staple of the summer season, but firing up the grill can be dangerous if you don’t follow the proper precautions.

Each year, grilling accidents cause nearly 10,000 home fires and send 16,000 people to the emergency room. But following a few grilling safety tips can keep the focus on good food and fun, not on first-aid:

  • Use grills outside only. Even small grills used inside create fire hazards, plus they release carbon monoxide, which can be fatal to people and pets without proper ventilation.
  • Keep the grill away from the home, deck railing, overhanging tree branches and any flammable decorations. Make sure nothing flammable can blow onto the grill.
  • Use the right lighter fluid for your grill, and store it away from the heat and out of the reach of children.
  • Establish a child- and pet-free zone. Make sure children and pets are indoors and/or being supervised by someone other than the cook. And keep them at least three feet from the grill. Burns from contacting a hot grill are especially common in kids under 5.
  • Clean the grill well before use. Grease and fat can build up on the grill and contribute to fires.
  • Don’t overload the grill. Excess fat dripping on the flames can cause major flare-ups.
  • Keep a spray bottle of water handy. Use it to douse small flare-ups before they get out of control. The bonus? Water won’t ruin the food.
  • Never leave your grill unattended. And remember that charcoal grills can stay hot for hours after use.
  • If your flame dies down, add dry kindling. Never add lighter fluid once the flame has been lit.

When using a gas grill

  • Make sure the lid is open before lighting it. This prevents flammable gas from being trapped in the chamber, which can cause an explosion.
  • If you smell gas and the flame is off, turn the gas off.
  • If you smell gas while using a gas grill and the flame is on, get away immediately. This is a sign that there is a leak. Call the fire department, and stay away from the grill.

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Fireworks safety tips from UK HealthCare

Got fireworks? Keep your Fourth fun, safe with these tips

Thousands of children and adolescents in the United States are injured in firework-related accidents every year during fireworks season, which starts now and runs through the middle of July.

In fact, in 2015, more than 3,000 children and young adults under the age of 20 in the United States were taken to emergency rooms with injuries related to fireworks.

Before you and your family head outside to enjoy the Fourth of July and other summer festivities, check out our tips for staying safe around fireworks.

  • Leave it to the professionals. Instead of setting off fireworks at home, attend a public fireworks display. You’ll be out of harm’s way and still be able to enjoy the show.
  • If you are using fireworks at home, take precautions. Never let children play with or light fireworks, and always read all warning labels before use.
  • Do not wear loose clothing while using fireworks. And be sure to stand several feet away from lit fireworks.
  • Have an extinguisher nearby. A bucket of water, hose or fire extinguisher will work.
  • Don’t try to relight a firework that hasn’t worked properly. Instead, put it out with water and get rid of it.
  • Be careful with sparklers. Sparklers heat up to more than 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit and present a real health risk, especially for small children. Instead of sparklers, let your little ones use glow sticks – they’ll have fun and stay safe, too.
  • Be prepared for an emergency. Have a phone nearby in case you need to call 911, and teach children what to do if their clothing catches fire (stop, drop and roll). In the case of an eye injury, avoid touching or rubbing it, which can make the injury worse, and get help immediately.

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sports-related injuries

5 tips to prevent sports-related injuries in kids

Warmer weather is here and the spring sports season is just around the corner. Now’s the time to make sure your kids take the right precautions to avoid sports-related injuries.

In 2013, more than 1 million children ages 19 and under were seen in emergency departments for injuries related to 14 commonly played sports. Here are some tips to help you and your kids prevent injury:

1. Get a physical

Before playing organized sports, make sure your child receives a pre-participation physical exam, or PPE. This should be performed by a doctor or a nurse practitioner or qualified clinician under the supervision of a physician.

2. Stay hydrated

Bring a water bottle to practice and games. Encourage children to stay well-hydrated by drinking plenty of water before, during and after play.

3. Stretch

Stretching before practice and games can release muscle tension and help prevent sports-related injuries, such as muscle tears or sprains. Make sure there is time set aside before every practice and game for athletes to warm up properly.

4. Take time off

Encourage kids to take time off from one sport to prevent overuse injuries. It is an opportunity to get stronger and develop skills learned in another sport.

5. Coaches, know your stuff

It’s also a good idea for coaches to get certified in first aid and CPR, learn the signs and symptoms of a concussion, and help avoid overuse injury by resting players during practices and games.


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Prevent medication poisoning in your home with these simple steps

To children, medication around the house might look like candy waiting to be consumed. That’s part of the reason why medicine is the leading cause of child poisoning in the U.S.

Every year, nearly 60,000 children are seen in the emergency room for medicine poisoning. Here are a few simple steps you can take to prevent medicine-related poisoning in your home.

Top tips for medication safety

  1. Put all medicine up, away and out of sight. In 86 percent of emergency department visits for medicine poisoning, children took medicine belonging to a parent or grandparent.
  2. Consider unlikely places where medicine is kept. Children can get access to medication in many places, some of which you might not consider, such as purses and nightstands. Place purses and bags in high locations and avoid leaving medicine on a nightstand or dresser.
  3. Consider products you might not think about as medicine. Health products such as vitamins, diaper rash creams, eye drops and hand sanitizer can be harmful if kids ingest them. Store these items up, away and out of sight, just as you would traditional medicine.
  4. Only use the dosing device that comes with the medicine. Kitchen spoons aren’t all the same, and a teaspoon or tablespoon used for cooking won’t measure the same amount of medicine as a dosing device.
  5. Write clear instructions for caregivers. When other caregivers are giving your child medicine, they need to know what medicine to give, how much to give and when to give it. Be clear and detailed in your instructions for caregivers.
  6. Save the Poison Help line in your phone: 800-222-1222. Put the toll-free number for the Poison Control Center into your home and cellphone. You should also put the number on your refrigerator or another place in your home where babysitters and caregivers can see it. Call the help line with any questions or concerns about medication. The Poison Help line is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

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6 tips to poison-proof your home

It’s not uncommon for kids to get their hands on potentially dangerous stuff around the house. From makeup and personal care products to pesticides and art supplies, many common household items represent a threat to children, especially if they’re ingested. In fact, nine out of 10 poisonings in children occur in the home.

This week is National Poison Prevention Week and the perfect time to learn how you can poison-proof your home and prevent accidental poisonings.

Poison-proof your home

  1. Store all household products and cleaning solutions out of children’s sight and reach. Young kids are often eye-level with items under the kitchen and bathroom sinks.
  2. Store poisonous items out of reach or use safety locks on cabinets within reach. These items also include liquid packets for the laundry and dishwasher.
  3. Read product labels to find out what can be hazardous to kids. Dangerous household items include health and beauty products, plants, cleaning and gardening supplies, lead, alcohol, and carbon monoxide.
  4. Make sure that all medications, including vitamins and adult medicines, are stored out of reach and out of sight for children.
  5. Put the toll-free number Poison Help Number (800-222-1222) in your home and cellphones. You should also post it near your home phone or on your refrigerator for the babysitter.
  6. Check for lead-based paint. Remove any peeling paint or chewable surfaces painted with lead-based paint.

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