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Owensboro Health Markey

Owensboro Health joins Markey Cancer Center Research Network

Owensboro Health has joined the UK Markey Cancer Center Research Network (MCCRN), giving patients in Western Kentucky and Southern Indiana increased access to innovative clinical research studies.

Areas of research will include epidemiology, prevention and early detection of cancer. Markey is a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center, which means Owensboro Health will have access to NCI-led trials in addition to MCCRN trials.

“Owensboro Health is proud to join the Markey Cancer Center Research Network, which is a distinguished and recognized name in cancer care and clinical research,” Owensboro Health President and CEO Greg Strahan said. “Owensboro Health exists to heal the sick and to improve the health of the communities we serve, and this partnership is a demonstration of our commitment to both parts of that mission.”

Owensboro Health was invited to participate in the Markey Research Network based on performance and achievements. Owensboro Health’s Mitchell Memorial Cancer Center serves the health system’s coverage area, a population of nearly 400,000 people across 14 counties in Western Kentucky and Southern Indiana. More than 1,000 patients are treated at the center annually.

“By becoming a member of the Markey Research Network, Owensboro Health is showing a commitment to helping us conquer cancer in the Commonwealth,” Markey Director Dr. Mark Evers said. “Clinical trials represent the latest, best treatment options for most patients, and being able to participate in major national and regional clinical trials right here in Owensboro means that patients are able to stay close to their own support systems at home and under the direct care of their doctors here.”

Mitchell Memorial Cancer Center also holds multiple accreditations and recognitions. These include accreditation from the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer and the CoC’s gold award, the highest recognition that body offers. Mitchell Memorial Cancer Center is also accredited by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers and the American College of Radiology and is an ACR-designated lung cancer screening center.

The importance of clinical trials

Clinical trials are key to developing new methods to prevent, detect and treat cancer, and most treatments used today are the results of previous clinical studies. These may include studies in which patients who need cancer treatment receive their therapy under the observation of specially trained cancer doctors and staff. Patients who volunteer for cancer treatment studies will either receive standard therapy or a new treatment that represents the researchers’ best new ideas for how to improve cancer care.

“Cancer care is constantly improving, due in part to the groundbreaking work being done in clinical research,” said Dr. Tim Mullett, medical director of the MCCRN. “Our state has some of the worst cancer incidence and survival rates in the entire country, and we at Markey have an obligation to address this devastating disease. By increasing access to many of our current clinical trials through the Markey Research Network, we have an opportunity to make real progress in improving cancer statistics in Kentucky.”

Markey’s clinical trials focus on the prevention, early detection and treatment of cancers with the highest incidence and mortality in Kentucky. These include lung, colorectal and cervical cancers. Owensboro Health is now one of six research sites in the MCCRN, and the first site in Western Kentucky. The MCCRN includes the following sites:

  • Hardin Memorial Hospital, Elizabethtown
  • King’s Daughters Medical Center, Ashland
  • Owensboro Health
  • St. Claire Regional Medical Center, Morehead
  • St. Mary’s Regional Cancer Center, Huntington, West Virginia
  • Tri-State Regional Cancer Center, Ashland

Watch the video below to find out how the Markey Research Network is bringing the future of cancer treatment to patients all across Kentucky.


Next steps:

Markey extends cancer network to Prestonsburg

Highlands Regional Medical Center in Prestonsburg, Ky., has announced a new affiliation with the UK Markey Cancer Center, the state’s only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center.

By becoming a UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network member, Highlands Regional Medical Center will now be able to offer more patients in Eastern Kentucky access to additional specialty and subspecialty care, including clinical trials and advanced technology, while allowing them to stay in their region for most treatments.

The UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network supports UK HealthCare’s overall mission of ensuring no Kentuckian will have to leave the state to get access to top-of-the-line healthcare.

“UK HealthCare doesn’t just serve Lexington and Central Kentucky – our mission is to provide all Kentuckians with the best possible care right here in the state,” said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK executive vice president for health affairs. “The Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network allows us to collaborate with community hospitals to provide top-notch cancer care much closer to home – saving both travel expenses and time for the patients, in addition to keeping them close to their personal support system.”

Highlands Regional Medical Center is a not-for-profit, community-owned and operated hospital established to serve Floyd, Johnson, Martin and Magoffin counties by providing high-quality health services and other community resources that will develop a healthier community.

“Affiliating with the UK Markey Cancer Center opens the door to numerous resources for our hospital and community,” said Harold C. Warman Jr., president and chief executive officer at Highlands Regional Medical Center. “Our staff will benefit from continued education opportunities, our community will benefit from health promotion and access to the most recent community-based cancer care, and our doctors will have access to the latest in cancer care professional education. Markey is a national leader in cancer research and care, and we are grateful for our association.”

The UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network was created to provide high-quality cancer care closer to home for patients across the region, and to minimize the effects of cancer through prevention and education programs, exceptional clinical care and access to research.

“Navigating cancer treatment can be challenging for patients and their families,” said Dr. Swaty Arora, medical oncologist/hematologist at Highlands Regional Medical Center. “At Highlands, our goal is to provide standard-of-care treatment in a timely and cost-effective manner. This affiliation validates our intention to provide quality care and affords access to resources to optimize patient care.”

The UK Markey Cancer Center is one of only 69 medical centers in the country to earn an NCI cancer center designation. Because of the designation, Markey patients have access to new drugs, treatment options and clinical trials offered only at NCI centers.

Moving forward, the UK Markey Cancer Center is working toward the next tier of designation – an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. Currently, 45 of the 69 NCI-designated cancer centers in the country hold a comprehensive cancer center status. The UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network will play a large role in bringing that next level of cancer funding to Kentucky.

“Kentucky is home to some of the worst cancer rates in the country,” said Dr. Timothy Mullett, medical director of the UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network. “Collaborating with our affiliate hospitals across the state will enable us to make a positive impact on the dire cancer rates here in the Commonwealth.”

The UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network began in 2006 and comprises 17 hospitals across the state of Kentucky. Learn more.

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Next steps:

  • Learn more about the UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network, which gives people across Kentucky access to high-quality cancer services and programs through collaboration with community hospitals.
  • Markey is Kentucky’s only NCI-designated cancer center, providing world-class cancer care right here in the Commonwealth. Learn more about why patients choose Markey for their cancer treatment.
cancer survivor

Markey clinic promotes quality of life for cancer survivors

This Sunday is National Cancer Survivors Day, an annual event that encourages those who have survived  cancer to celebrate milestones and supports patients and families currently going through treatment.

At the UK Markey Cancer Center, we have a specialized program just for cancer survivors that offers support and resources to help navigate the complicated and often-overwhelming aspects of life after treatment.

Cancer Survivorship Clinic

Even after treatment is complete, cancer can impact a patient’s physical, emotional, social and financial well-being. Our Cancer Survivorship Clinic is designed to help patients overcome those challenges by connecting their medical history with their future quality of life as a cancer survivor.

When a patient is referred to the Survivorship Clinic, they meet with a provider who specializes in survivorship care. That provider then works with the patient to customize a personalized plan that coordinates ongoing medical care and promotes the patient’s health and wellness moving forward.

Individual care plans address important aspects of patients’ continued care including long-term effects of treatment, diet and nutrition, emotional and psychological support, and social and financial concerns.

The Cancer Survivorship Clinics are located in the Whitney-Hendrickson Building and the Ben Roach Building at the UK Markey Cancer Center. If you have questions about our clinic or would like to make an appointment, please call us at 800-333-8874.

Expressions of Courage

Later this month, Markey and the Survivorship Clinic will host the annual Expressions of Courage event, a cancer survivor celebration timed to coincide with other nationwide celebrations in June for Cancer Survivorship Month.

Expressions of Courage honors the experiences of those who have battled cancer by displaying their art and creative expressions, many of which can be linked to their cancer experiences. This year’s event is scheduled from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on June 9 and will feature visual, literary, and musical performances from Markey cancer survivors as well as a free lunch and access to support services.

Learn more about Expressions of Courage and register for the event today.


Next steps:

  • Markey is Kentucky’s only NCI-designated cancer center, providing world-class cancer care right here in the Commonwealth. Learn more about why patients choose Markey for their cancer treatment.
  • When her previous oncologist told Annette Osborne there was no hope, she came to Markey and found another chance at life. Read Annette’s story.
During the third annual Appalachian Research Day, UK researchers revealed the insights of their studies aimed at addressing health problems of rural Ky.

Appalachian Research Day addresses rural health issues

Inviting researchers to “come sit on the porch” and share their findings with community members, the UK Center for Excellence in Rural Health (CERH) hosted its third annual Appalachian Research Day in Hazard, Ky., on May 24.

Rural Appalachian communities experience some of the most severe health disparities in the nation, and community-based research is an effective method to identify problems and develop collaborative, effective solutions.

This type of engaged research begins at the local level, built on the foundation of relationships with individuals, neighborhoods and groups who have common questions and concerns. And for many researchers at UK and partner institutions, the CERH is an indispensable resource for conducting community-based research. It provides local connections, infrastructure, dedicated research personnel and a team of community health workers, called Kentucky Homeplace, who engage participants and gather data.

“Appalachian Research Day is an important and exciting day for us each year at the UK Center of Excellence in Rural Health. It is an opportunity for us to provide research updates to our community about relevant issues that affect all of us,” said Fran Feltner, director of the CERH. “Appalachian Research Day is also an opportunity for dialogue with community members to discuss what we can come up with together to better our lives in Appalachia.”

This year’s event, which was held at Hazard Community and Technical College to accommodate the growing number of participants, included Hazard Mayor Jimmy Lindon and Perry County Judge-Executive Scott Alexander, who both made remarks during lunch. Also present were Andrea Begley, field office representative for U.S. Congressman Hal Rogers, and Jenna Meyer of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who is on special assignment in Eastern Kentucky for the Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR) initiative.

Research insights in cancer, addiction, nutrition

Featured presentations reported findings from five health research studies conducted with Appalachian communities:

  • Dr. Susanne Arnold, associate director of clinical translation at the UK Markey Cancer Center, presented her research examining the interrelated causes of lung cancer and how to combat them. She reported that lung cancer risk has environmental, physical and molecular causes, some of which can be prevented.
  • Nancy Schoenberg, PhD, associate dean for research of the UK College of Public Health and Marion Pearsall Professor of Behavioral Science in the UK College of Medicine, studies the health of grandfamilies in Appalachia. Her recent study with rural adults over age 65 found that half of them struggled to make ends meet and experienced many physical health problems.
  • Dr. Judith Feinberg, professor in the Department of Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry at West Virginia University School of Medicine, studies behavioral medicine and psychiatry. She presented her research on addiction as a chronic, relapsing brain disease, reporting that syringe services programs (SSPs) operate under the principles of harm reduction and have been shown to offer significant protection for people injecting drugs, including lower risk of HIV infection.
  • Jarod T. Giger, PhD, of the UK colleges of social work, medicine and public health, studies child well-being in Eastern Kentucky. In a recent study, he found that children in three Eastern Kentucky counties reported relatively high amounts of electronic health literacy but low amounts of overall life satisfaction and affective and psychological well-being.
  • Omopé Carter Daboiku is an Appalachian foodways scholar who leads workshops that operate on an emotional level to help participants understand that adapting family recipes to healthier versions doesn’t disrespect one’s ancestors. Her work incorporates nostalgic attachment to food memories, with the understanding that the relationships these memories invoke can make it difficult to prepare healthier food.

Next steps:

Annette Osborne, a cancer patient with not much time to live, was referred to a Markey physician. His innovative treatment allowed Osborne to keep living.

After grim prognosis, Winchester woman finds answers at Markey

For Annette Osborne, a cancer patient from Winchester, the prognosis was not good. Her oncologist had given up. “Enjoy the time you have left with your family, there’s nothing more we can do,” he told her.

But Osborne wasn’t ready to die, at least not without a fight. She wasn’t ready to give up on being there for her husband and children or watching her grandchildren grow up.

Initially, Osborne had ignored the symptoms that turned out to be cancer. She’d been caring for her ailing father, so it was easy to overlook her own aches and pains.

When she noticed abnormal bleeding, she saw her gynecologist, who said it was likely nothing to be concerned about, that it was probably a small tear that would heal on its own. When that didn’t happen, she went back for more tests. That was when she learned she had vaginal cancer.

After her oncologist told her to prepare to die, Osborne pushed back, and the doctor offered one more sliver of hope.

Dr. Jonathan Feddock at the UK Markey Cancer Center was doing some innovative treatment. Osborne seized her chance, and in early 2016, she met with Feddock to see if he could help her.

An uncommon approach

Feddock, an assistant professor in the Department of Radiation Medicine, was the only physician in the area providing a brachytherapy treatment known as permanent interstitial implants. Brachytherapy, a type of internal radiation therapy, uses radiation to destroy cancer cells and shrink tumors. While brachytherapy is a common treatment option, the use of permanent seeds which, in Osborne’s case, were placed free-handed inside the vagina, were not.

According to Feddock, the general opinion among most oncologists is that once a patient develops a recurrence of their cancer and it is in a part of their body that has been radiated before, there is no curative treatment other than radical surgery. But access to an NCI-designated cancer center and physicians who conduct research on new treatment options is part of the reason Osborne is alive today.

And she is doing better than she could have ever imagined. She’s been able to watch one of her daughters become a mother and attend sleepovers with her granddaughter. “It’s the small things that I appreciate, like a beautiful spring day and the chance to enjoy the sun. This disease has taken so many people that I know; I take the chance to enjoy anything I can,” Osborne said.

Feddock has a positive outlook on her prognosis as well. “Our own results suggest that if there is no sign of cancer coming back after six months, then most women tend to do well,” he said. It’s been more than a year since Osborne’s treatment, Feddock continued, “so in her case, I am hopeful that this cancer is behind her.”

Looking toward the future

Osborne is excited for what the future could hold for her. A nurse by training, she’s interested in working with cancer patients when she returns to work. “I’ve been thinking about going back to the healthcare field; there may be more schooling in my future,” she said. Her experience as a patient who was told the end was near is something Osborne believes will make her a more empathetic healthcare provider.

Osborne has been back at the gym and preparing for her healthier life. She’s even excited to be training for her first 5K.

A referral to Dr. Feddock and an unwillingness to give up are what she credits for having the chance to enjoy the rest of her life, and that’s exactly what she plans to do.


Next steps:

  • Caring physicians, clinical trials and the power of advanced medicine all come together at the UK Markey Cancer Center to give patients the best treatment possible.
  • For many women, getting regular Pap smears could be the difference between catching cervical cancer early or discovering it late.
Meet the Researcher Day

UK cancer researchers welcome middle, high school students

Middle and high school students from across the region came to UK and UK HealthCare last week for an up-close look at what it’s like to be a cancer researcher.

“Meet the Researcher Day,” hosted by the UK Markey Cancer Center and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS), is a field trip reward given to schools in the region that successfully raise more than $1,000 for the LLS’s Pennies for Patients campaign.

This year, students from Shelby County West Middle School, Mercer County Senior High School, Henry County Middle School and New Albany High School in Indiana won the opportunity to visit the Biomedical/Biological Sciences Research Building on UK’s campus and learn more about how the money they raised for Pennies for Patients will help further cancer research.

After an introduction by UK researchers Tianyan Gao and Craig Vander Kooi, the students received a tour of different cancer research labs and learned how to use basic lab equipment. The event also featured remarks from Dr. John D’Orazio, a pediatric oncologist and cancer researcher as well as LLS Honored Hero Brad Wilson, a UK chemical engineering student and two-time leukemia survivor. The students also heard a panel discussion about careers in science featuring D’Orazio and UK students Michael Gosky and Payton Stevens.

“I think it’s important that students get to see the lab spaces, meet the researchers and understand what the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and Markey Cancer Center mission is: The cure for cancer,” said Shelia Gustafson, campaign director for the Kentucky and Southern Indiana Chapter of LLS.

Pennies for Patients is the annual fundraiser for the Student Series of the LLS. It encourages students to collect spare change during a three-week period early in the year. Funds raised support leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma research; patient and community service; public health education; and professional education.

For this year’s campaign, 485 schools across the region participated, raising more than $400,000 – a new record. The schools participating in Pennies for Patients had to raise a minimum of $1,000 to win the chance to attend Meet the Researchers Day. The four schools at Meet the Researchers Day this year were chosen in a random drawing, raising more than $10,000 combined for LLS.

Check out the video below for highlights from this year’s Meet the Research Day.


Next steps:

  • Learn more about clinical trials at Markey, which give patients access to the most up-to-date cancer research and innovations.
  • Markey is Kentucky’s only NCI-designated cancer center, providing world-class cancer care right here in the Commonwealth. Learn more about why patients choose Markey for their cancer treatment.
UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network

Markey extends cancer network to Somerset

Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital in Somerset has announced a new affiliation with the UK Markey Cancer Center, the state’s only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center.

The UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network was created to provide high-quality cancer care closer to home for patients across the region and to minimize the effects of cancer through prevention and education programs, exceptional clinical care, and access to research.

By becoming a Markey affiliate, Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital will now be able to offer its patients access to additional specialty and subspecialty physicians and care, including clinical trials and advanced technology, while allowing them to stay in South Central Kentucky for most treatments.

The Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network supports UK HealthCare’s overall mission of ensuring no Kentuckian will have to leave the state to get access to top-of-the-line healthcare.

“UK HealthCare doesn’t just serve Lexington and Central Kentucky – our mission is to provide all Kentuckians with the best possible care right here in the state,” said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK executive vice president for health affairs. “The Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network allows us to collaborate with community hospitals to provide top-notch cancer care much closer to home – saving both travel expenses and time for the patients, in addition to keeping them close to their personal support system.”

Established in 1976, Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital is a 295-bed acute care facility, providing healthcare services for an 11-county service area in South Central Kentucky. With more than 40 physician specialties and nearly 200 physicians on staff, Lake Cumberland offers the most comprehensive services in the region.

“As we work toward fulfilling our mission of ‘Making Communities Healthier,’ it is clear to me that the relationship between Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital and the Markey Cancer Center will go a long way in achieving that goal,” said Tim Bess, Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital chief executive officer. “Our community will benefit greatly from this relationship. We are honored to partner with the UK Markey Cancer Center.”

Markey is one of only 69 medical centers in the country to earn an NCI cancer center designation. Because of the designation, Markey patients have access to new drugs, treatment options and clinical trials offered only at NCI centers.

Moving forward, Markey is working toward the next tier of designation – an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. Currently, 47 of the 69 NCI-designated cancer centers in the country hold a comprehensive cancer center status. The Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network will play a significant role in bringing that next level of cancer funding to Kentucky.

“The burden of cancer in Kentucky is huge, and unfortunately we have some of the worst cancer rates in the country,” said Dr. Timothy Mullett, medical director of the UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network. “By collaborating with our affiliate hospitals across the state, we have the potential to make a serious impact on cancer care here in the Commonwealth.”

The UK Markey Cancer Center Affiliate Network began in 2006 and currently has 17 member hospitals across the state of Kentucky. Learn more.


Next steps:

Siddhi Shroff, a registered dietitian at Markey, spoke with us about her job here and the things she enjoys doing in her free time.

Get to know Siddhi Shroff, foodie and registered dietitian at Markey

Siddhi Shroff, RD

For patients with cancer, maintaining proper diet and nutrition can make a world of difference. Siddhi Shroff, a registered dietitian at the UK Markey Cancer Center, spends her time helping patients understand their changing appetite and nutritional needs as they go through treatment. She’s also the author of our Markey Menu blog, which offers cancer-related nutritional tips, recipes, and health and wellness information.

We sat down with Siddhi to chat about her work at Markey, her interest in nutrition and what she enjoys outside of work.

How did you become interested in nutrition?

I have a nontraditional background, originally with a psychology degree, and took a break before coming back to grad school. I’ve always been a foodie and became very interested in nutrition and dietetics. I just got the point where I thought, “Why don’t I do something like this?”

I came here for grad school and learned about nutrition. That’s how I got exposure to the oncology setting during my dietetic internship rotations. It was a really different experience than I had been educated on, and it was interesting to see how individualized the cancer treatment process can be, specifically with nutrition. So I finished the rotation and then graduated, and I started here in May of last year!

What do you do as a registered dietitian at Markey?

On a daily basis, it’s hard to pin down a specific routine. In the clinics, we are here to provide nutritional counseling to patients as needed. We work as we get consulted. A doctor or nurse will see a patient in clinic, and they will flag anything of nutritional concern like poor appetite or unintentional weight loss. We come in to talk with the patient about whatever has been flagged and what the patient may be experiencing. We always let them know about general nutrition expectations and what they may experience due to side effects of treatments.

Aside from nutrition counseling, I participate in many other events and activities. Rachel Miller, RD, and I both host the Smoothie Day demonstrations, and I host the cooking demonstrations with local restaurants and chefs. Those are great for showing patients a different way to manage the changes in their nutrition. You can read a lot about the nutrition recommendations on the Markey Menu blog I write!

How do you spend time outside of work?

When I’m at home, I really enjoy reading and gardening. I have always been a foodie, so baking is another hobby. In general, I’m always working on my project of the day, whatever crafting I might be doing at the time. Of course, I watch my share of Netflix, too.

Have you read any good books or watched any good TV lately?

I’ve been reading lots of articles about how to be your best self – not only professionally, but outside of work in your daily life, too. It’s all around self-care.

My go-to shows are Friends, The Office, and Parks and Recreation. Those are the shows I can sit back to watch and unwind. I do like my HBO, too Game of Thrones especially.

Do you have any funny or unusual talents?

I do have this weird ability to always pick out a celebrity voice that’s narrating a commercial. So, let me think. John Krasinski from The Office is the Esurance guy. I’ve noticed Zach Braff has been in a few. Julia Roberts has done some Progressive commercials. Those are the ones that I can think of just off the top of my head!

If you could have dinner with any celebrity, who would it be and what would the meal be?

That is a hard question because I can think of plenty of strong women I’d love to meet right now, so it’s tough to pick just one. One person that does come to mind is Malala Yousafzai. She is a girl who was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman at the age of 15 and survived. Now, she is a pioneer for children’s rights and education throughout the world. She is even the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate. I really admire her work, but I’d also like to meet her just to talk to her about how to be strong in the face of adversity.

For the meal? I think I’d let her pick that. But I’d insist on picking something Italian like tiramisu for dessert.


Next steps:

NACCDO-PAMN

Markey hosts conference for nation’s elite cancer centers

Highlighting Lexington and the services and expertise of UK HealthCare, the UK Markey Cancer Center and the Markey Cancer Foundation served last week as hosts for the 2017 annual conference for the National Association of Cancer Center Development Officers (NACCDO) and the Public Affairs and Marketing (PAMN) Network of National Cancer Centers.

In total, 437 participants representing more than 75 cancer institutions attended this year’s conference, making it one of the highest-attended conferences since the joint event began in 1987.

The NACCDO-PAMN annual conference is an opportunity for public relations, marketing and development professionals who work for major cancer centers to network and learn more from their peers about the best practices for highlighting their center’s cancer research and clinical care.

Members of the UK HealthCare community who presented during the the three-day conference included Kentucky Neuroscience Institute’s Dr. Dan Han as well as Robert DiPaola, dean of the UK College of Medicine. Han hosted a session with Kentucky Chef Ouita Michel focused on neurogastronomy, the study of how the brain influences our perceptions of what we eat. Their interactive presentation explored the unique application of using neurogastronomy to help cancer patients whose taste and appetite have been affected by treatment. DiPaola was on-hand to lead a panel discussion of cancer center directors.

Conference participants also had the option of attending a “Markey patient experience tour” highlighting six of the cancer center’s integrative medicine offerings: a cooking demo, art therapy, music therapy, narrative medicine, jin shin jyutsu, hand massage/aromatherapy and a UK HealthCare Arts in HealthCare tour.

“We were honored to host our fellow cancer center colleagues here in Lexington for this year’s conference,” said Mike Delzotti, president of the Markey Cancer Foundation. “We enjoyed not only the opportunity to provide valuable education and information for other cancer communicators across the nation, but also the chance to show off some of the things that make Markey, and Kentucky, so special.”

Check out the video below for more highlights from the conference.


Next steps:

Kate Zaytseva, one of four project leaders on the COBRE grant for the Center for Cancer and Metabolism, and postdoc Naser Jafari are studying the importance of an enzyme called fatty acid synthase in controlling survival and spread of colorectal cancer.

UK wins $11.2 million NIH grant to study cancer-obesity link

UK has been awarded an $11.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the link between cancer and metabolic disorders, including obesity. The prestigious award will enable UK to launch the UK Center for Cancer and Metabolism (CCM).

The Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grant to study the metabolism of cancer comes from the NIH’s National Institutes of General Medical Sciences and will fund the UK Center for Cancer and Metabolism over the next five years.

Kentucky has disproportionately high incidences of both cancer and metabolic disorders – our state leads the nation in cancer deaths and is in the top 10 for highest obesity rates in the country. While scientists have long known of a direct link between obesity and cancer, the need for further research into this field is a necessity for Kentuckians.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, an advocate of the 21st Century Cures Act, contacted NIH Director Francis S. Collins on behalf of UK’s grant application.

“In an effort to improve healthcare access and outcomes for my constituents, UK has long made a priority of undertaking important research specific to Kentucky and the Appalachian region,” McConnell said.

“Over the years, UK and its Markey Cancer Center have developed one of the strongest cancer research, prevention and treatment programs in the country, as demonstrated by the center’s 2013 NIH National Cancer Institute designation, which I was proud to support. I was also pleased to assist UK in securing this competitive grant to advance and strengthen this critical health research for Kentucky by enabling advanced research focusing on the development of novel therapies for cancer treatment.”

Kentucky Representative Andy Barr echoed McConnell’s sentiments, noting that support and funding for innovative cancer research remains a priority.

“The awarding of this competitive grant is a recognition of the University of Kentucky as a national leader in biomedical research,” Barr said. “I have consistently supported the National Institutes of Health because these investments not only contribute to our local communities and institutions, they will improve and even save lives by advancing new treatments and cures. I am confident the healthcare services provided by the NCI-designated Markey Cancer Center and the research done by UK scientists funded by this grant will help us to find better ways to fight cancer, which will benefit patients and families in Kentucky and around the world.”

Linking metabolism and cancer

The UK Center for Cancer and Metabolism capitalizes on highly specialized institutional strengths in cancer and advanced metabolomics tools to focus on the underlying mechanisms that link dysfunctional metabolism to cancer. Recent studies have shown that the metabolic powerhouse of cells – the mitochondria – can influence how aggressive a cancer becomes.

UK has internationally renowned experts in the field of cancer and metabolism, and new state-of-the-art technology has improved the ability to understand how metabolism impacts cancer.

“As the University for Kentucky, we are uniquely positioned to conduct this level of sophisticated research thanks to the presence of a diverse array of biomedical researchers, clinicians and our leading academic medical center,” UK President Eli Capilouto said. “Research and development is at the core of economic and human development, and it is why UK is Kentucky’s most instrumental change agent, health provider and economic engine. The progress we make offers the brightest future and best hope for Kentucky.”

The CCM will bring together highly complementary disciplinary strengths at UK in cancer, metabolism and data sciences, coupled with sophisticated metabolomics tools and advanced cancer imaging capabilities, to strengthen the university’s cancer research enterprise by providing a thematically focused multidisciplinary infrastructure dedicated to defining the role of metabolism in the development and treatment of cancer.

“Research is at the heart of any progress we hope to make in bridging health gaps in the Commonwealth,” said Lisa Cassis, UK vice president for research. “Increased funding opportunities through the 21st Century Cures Act, and in particular this COBRE focused on cancer and metabolism, will enable the university to foster the development of the next generation of scientists who will lead our efforts in translating basic research findings into promising new therapies.”

Fighting back against cancer in Kentucky

The scientific discoveries achieved through the CCM will continue to help the UK Markey Cancer Center in its mission to conquer cancer in the Commonwealth. As Markey prepares to renew its National Cancer Institute Cancer Center designation, and simultaneously compete to become a Comprehensive Cancer Center later in 2017, Markey Director Dr. Mark Evers emphasizes the need for increased cancer research funding and continuing to push for new discoveries.

“Nowhere in the country is it more important to have this level of cancer research underway,” Evers said. “Kentuckians face a unique set of health issues, but we at the UK Markey Cancer Center are distinctly positioned to help solve the problem. Being an NCI-designated cancer center means being a leader in research as well as clinical care and outreach. This funding will allow us to translate our findings into potential new therapies for cancer patients from Kentucky and beyond.”

The CCM leverages expertise with mentors and collaborators from across multiple UK centers, disciplines and departments. The multidisciplinary collaboration is indicative of the type of work ongoing at UK and UK HealthCare every day.

“This new funding is another example of the vital importance to the people of Kentucky – and this region – in having an academic medical center at the University of Kentucky,” said Dr. Michael Karpf, UK executive vice president for health affairs. “The synergy and collaboration between researchers and clinicians to further studies in cancer can only be done at a place like this, where people are working together to make a difference in the lives of patients now and for generations to come.”

Promoting collaboration

COBRE grants also use this platform to develop promising early-stage investigators with enhanced skillsets in exciting new areas of cancer research and to enhance their success in competing for NIH grant support. The grant promotes collaborative, interactive efforts among researchers with complementary backgrounds, skills and expertise.

Four junior investigators, mentored by teams of clinicians and scientists from a variety of disciplines, departments, and colleges at UK, will lead major projects investigating an aspect of cancer metabolism:

  • “Role of vitamin D in protecting against cachexia in cancer patients,” led by Travis Thomas, Department of Clinical Sciences, UK College of Health Sciences
  • “Role of serine biosynthesis pathway in breast cancer,” led by Yadi Wu, Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, UK College of Medicine
  • “Role of RORα in breast cancer metastasis,” led by Ren Xu, Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, UK College of Medicine
  • “Role of fatty acid synthase in colorectal cancer,” led by Kate Zaytseva, Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, UK College of Medicine

The CCM is co-led by program directors Daret St. Clair, professor and James Graham Brown Foundation Endowed Chair in the UK Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, and Peter Zhou, professor in the UK Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.

“Having the kind of environment where learning and collaboration are placed at the forefront is why we were chosen for this grant, and we hope to continue that throughout the life of this center,” St. Clair said. “It will also enable us to reach out to new and talented researchers who want to come to UK to become new project leaders and continue the work we’re doing.”


Watch the video below to learn more about the Center for Cancer and Metabolism.


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