water safety

Going to the pool? Keep the kids safe with these tips

Memorial Day marks the unofficial start of summer, and pools everywhere will be opening this weekend.

Swimming and water recreation can be great fun, but they can also be dangerous. So before you and your family hit the water, check out these tips for keeping the kids safe.

Water safety tips to teach your children:

  • Learn how to swim.
  • Always swim with a buddy.
  • If you can’t swim, don’t get in water deeper than your shoulders.
  • Always wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life vest when you are playing water sports, when you’re near an open body of water or when you’re on a boat.
  • Never run, push or jump on others around water.
  • If you see someone struggling in the water, shout for help. Don’t try to rescue the person yourself.

Water safety tips for adults to keep in mind:

  • Never leave children alone near water – adults must supervise at all times.
  • Never let children swim alone – no exceptions to this rule, ever.
  • Children in baby bath seats and rings must be within arm’s reach every second.
  • Teach children to swim after age 4.
  • Never substitute a flotation device for supervision.
  • Do not allow children to run, push or jump on others around water.
  • Learn CPR for infants, children and adults.

In case of drowning

According to the CDC, two children 14 and younger in the United States die by drowning every day. And for every child who dies from drowning, another five receive emergency department care for nonfatal submersion injuries.

In a drowning accident, seconds make the difference between survival, recovery or death. Drownings occur when a child is left unattended, even for a brief moment. If a child is missing, always check the water first before looking elsewhere. Wading pools, swimming pools, spas, hot tubs, lakes, rivers, oceans, bathtubs, buckets and even toilets all pose a risk of drowning.

If you see someone struggling in the water:

  • Shout for help immediately.
  • Find something you can throw out to the person to pull him or her to safety, such as a life preserver, rope or towel.
  • If you can’t reach the person, throw out a floating object he or she can hold onto until additional help arrives.
  • Never swim right to the person. He or she is scared and may accidentally hurt you.
  • If no one hears your shout, call 911.

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