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Headed to the orchard? Use your apples in this easy, healthy recipe

Siddhi Shroff

Siddhi Shroff

Written by Siddhi Shroff, a registered dietitian at the UK Markey Cancer Center.

Fall is here! And that means apple season is upon us.

Many people look forward to apple festivals, trips to orchards and all the tasty apple treats, such as pie, cider and doughnuts. Although these seasonal favorites can be loaded with added sugars and refined ingredients that can be unhealthy when consumed in excess, fresh apples offer many beneficial nutrients for your health.

Apples are a good source of fiber – a large apple provides about 5g, or about 20 percent of your daily recommended intake. They’re a good source of vitamin C, too, which is essential to the growth and repair of tissues in the body, such as cartilage, bones and teeth. Vitamin C also helps heal wounds and form scar tissue. Additionally, apples are also low in calories and low in fat, which can help with weight maintenance.

Here’s even more reason to incorporate apples and other fruits and vegetables into your diet: According to the American Institute of Cancer Research, current evidence shows that diets high in foods containing dietary fiber can lower the risk of colorectal cancer, and diets high in fruit could lower the risk of cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx and lung.

Here’s an easy, healthy and delicious recipe that uses our favorite fall fruit:

Healthy Cinnamon Skillet Apples

Adapted from Healthy-Liv

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup water.
  • 6 fresh apples, any type you prefer.
  • 1-2 teaspoons cinnamon.
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans, optional for topping.

Directions:

  1. Toast nuts in a medium skillet over medium-low heat for six to eight minutes or until slightly fragrant. Remove from skillet.
  2. Peel and chop apples into small, fairly uniform pieces. Turn the skillet onto medium-low heat and add water. Next, add apples and cinnamon to taste, stirring and cooking until apples are softened over six to 10 minutes. If the water evaporates, add a little more water as the apples cook.
  3. Add cooked apples to serving bowls and top with toasted nuts. You can also let the apples cool and stir them into plain or vanilla yogurt. Store leftovers in the refrigerator for up to five days.

Next steps:

Put your tomatoes to good use with these healthy recipes

Autumn may have just begun, but you still have time to take advantage of in-season summer vegetables like tomatoes.

Tomatoes are a great source of beta-carotene and lycopene, which are part of a group of antioxidants called carotenoids that can help prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer. They are found in many fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

Lycopene is most present in tomatoes. Cooking tomatoes over heat makes the lycopene easier for the body to use. Beta-carotene is converted to Vitamin A in the body, which is beneficial for healthy vision, bone growth, reproduction, cell function and for the immune system. Also, tomatoes are great source of potassium.

Sound good? Try these tomato and basil recipes. Basil has a sweet yet savory taste that pairs well with tomatoes. For those experiencing taste changes, it has a mild flavor to complement foods, and it is more palatable than strong flavors like spices.

Curious when your favorite fruits and vegetables are in season? Find out here.

Tomato Basil Bruschetta, 12 servings

Ingredients

  • 8 tomatoes (ripe, Roma plum, chopped)
  • 2 garlic cloves (minced)
  • ½  red onion (chopped)
  • 6 basil leaves (fresh)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (extra-virgin)
  • Salt (optional, to taste)
  • Pepper (optional, to taste)
  • 2 mini French bread (or Italian, cut into ½-inch diagonal slices)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Combine tomatoes, garlic, onion, basil and olive oil in a bowl. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste (optional). Set aside.
  3. Arrange bread on a baking sheet in a single layer. Bake about five to seven minutes until it begins to brown slightly.
  4. Remove bread from oven and transfer to a serving platter.
  5. Serve the tomato mixture in a bowl with a serving spoon, or place some on each slice of bread before serving. If adding the tomato mixture yourself, add it at the last minute or the bread may become soggy.

Source: What’s Cooking? USDA Mixing Bowl

Tomato Basil Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 cups fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 3 (14.5-ounce) cans no-salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 2 cups fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced
  • Basil leaves (optional)

Directions

  1. Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic, and stir constantly while cooking for 30 seconds.
  2. Stir in the broth, salt and tomatoes; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
  3. Stir in basil. Place half of the soup in a blender. Process until smooth.
  4. Pour pureed soup into a bowl. Repeat procedure with remaining soup.
  5. Garnish with basil leaves (optional).

Source: MyRecipes.com


Next steps:

Join us for a chicken marinade cooking demonstration

Cooking Demo – Thursday, March 3

Join us at 1 p.m. on Thursday, March 3 for a cooking demonstration and samples! This is a free event. Learn how to make five different chicken marinade dishes: lemon chicken, rosemary balsamic chicken, honey raspberry chicken, maple Dijon chicken, and Thai peanut chicken. Each sauce has been chosen to combat a different taste change that some may experience as a side effect of cancer treatment. Rice and vegetables will be served as well.

Location: 306 Whitney-Hendrickson Building, Psych-Oncology Services

Contact Rachel Miller, MS, RD, LD, for more information.

Phone: 859-257-0519

Email: rachel.c.miller@uky.edu

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